Madison-2008

The 52st Annual Meeting of the ISSS was held July 13-18, 2008 at the University of Wisconsin - Madison

The Madison 2008 Retrospective includes digests, photographs, presentations and downloadable MP3 audio. Other pages, including the content below, have been retained as a reference.

Location: University of Wisconsin, Memorial Union, 800 Langdon Street, Madison, Wisconsin

The title for this conference borrows from Gregory Bateson’s definition of information as “a difference that makes a difference.” The question for systems researchers and practitioners is, “what difference are we making?”

The Challenge

The modern systems movement draws upon a rich tradition developed by some of the best and brightest minds of the 20th and 21st centuries. Systems and cybernetic concepts have filtered into much of the scientific literature of the past five decades, and the common media of today is infused with systems-inspired words such as feedback, input/output, regulation, and interdependence. And yet, the systems tradition itself appears to remain largely invisible as an actionable, practical body of knowledge to many of the scientists, academics, politicians and businesspeople who are making the decisions that deeply impact our collective social, economic, and ecological future. The low profile of systems thinking as a discipline among the influential leaders of our time represents a crucial opportunity for the systems community to make a difference in the world in ways that may matter most. The questions naturally arise:

  • How can we as a community make systems concepts more accessible to decision makers and researchers in the larger global community?
  • How can members of the systems community apply the existing, rich knowledge base of systems concepts and methodologies toward making a positive, sustainable difference within our own spheres of influence?

Toward Making a Difference

The 52nd Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Systems Sciences will bring together professionals on the cutting-edge of the systems movement with influential decision makers facing far-reaching, real-world complexities on a daily basis. While we must continue to make systems theories and approaches ever more rigorous, to remain relevant we must also connect our work with the dilemmas in the world for which people are seeking solutions right now. The objective of ISSS 2008 is to further build much-needed bridges between rigor and relevance in systems work. Speakers and authors are invited to present who can address any part of this spectrum, from better methods for systems research to clarifying the nature of real-world problems in need of resolution.

We encourage those interested in attending the conference to register today and begin working with us in creating this important event.

Confirmed Plenary Guest Speakers

  • Timothy F. H. Allen, President-elect, ISSS (2009) and Professor, Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin
  • Steve Carpenter, Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin
  • Manfred Drack, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science, Vienna, Austria
  • Jon Foley, Professor, Department of Sustainability and Global Environment, University of Wisconsin
  • David L. Hawk, Dean of the School of Management and Faculty in the New Jersey School of Architecture, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Doug McDavid, Executive Research Consultant, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA
  • Bobby Milstein, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Syndemics Prevention Network
  • Bill Rouse, Professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with a joint appointment in the College of Computing. Also, Fellow, International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) 2006 and recipient of the IBM Faculty Award in 2005 and 2006
  • David Schwartz, Professor, Chemistry and Genetics, University of Wisconsin
  • David Waltner-Toews, Professor, Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph and founding president of the Network for Ecosystem Sustainability and Health
  • Jennifer Wilby, Director of the Centre for Systems Studies and faculty member in Management Systems at the University of Hull, UK

Important Dates

  • December 5, 2007: The start of abstract submission and registration. Instructions for Preparing and Submitting Abstracts and Papers for ISSS Madison 2008 are available.  (Please allow at least two weeks for your abstract to be reviewed.) Please note that the login userid and password to  journals.isss.org is independent of the userid and password on the ISSS World web site.
  • December 5, 2007: The on-line registration will be managed using the University of Wisconsin, Madison, registration system. This is now available at Conference Registration. Off-line paper registrations (by post and fax) will still be available through contact with the ISSS office.
  • February 1, 2008: On-line hotel reservation is also available through Conference Registration.
  • March 1, 2008: The deadline for panel, workshop and stream proposals.
  • April 30, 2008: The end of early, discounted registration.
  • May 10, 2008: The deadline for abstracts and full papers, recognizing that some abstracts will not be developed into full papers. Late papers may still be accepted for the conference after May 10, 2008, but will be published on the CD-ROM proceedings for the subsequent year.) Only ONE paper per registered participant will be accepted for the conference.
  • Abstracts submitted after May 10 will be considered for inclusion in the program on a space-available basis.

Venue

The meeting will be held in the Memorial Union Building at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, on the shores of Lake Mendota in downtown Madison. Madison is the Wisconsin state capital city with a population of 208,000. It offers the perfect combination of natural beauty, stimulating cultural offerings, outdoor recreation, distinctive restaurants, unique shops and vibrant nightlife.

The university’s location in south central Wisconsin makes for convenient access to Milwaukee (80 miles), Chicago (150 miles) and Minneapolis (270 miles). Daily buses serve all three cities.

Social Programs

There will be an opening welcome reception in the Memorial Union Building on Sunday evening, July 13. The conference banquet will be held on Thursday, July 17. Detailed plans will be announced later. Sightseeing tours at reasonable prices will also be organized for accompanying persons during the conference.

Registration

Registration fees are as described below:

    Conference Fees
Regular   $525USD
Retired   $425USD
Developing country   $400USD
Student   $325USD
Additional banquet ticket $45USD

The registration fee includes:

  • The program/abstract book
  • 2008 CD-ROM proceedings
  • Reception on Sunday July 13
  • One banquet ticket for Thursday July 17
  • ISSS membership fees for 2009

The registration fees also includes tea/coffee breaks and lunches from Monday to Thursday.

The registration fee does not cover accommodation (bookable separately through online registration) or transportation expenses to and from the conference site.

Accommodation ranges from very well appointed dormitary rooms to mid- and upper-range hotels (for prices and details about each accommodation, see Madison Accommodation). This page only details accommodation available through the conference registration website. There are several locations on campus available for the purchase of meals.

Committees

Conference Partners (includes those under negotiation)

Quick Links:

Madison 2008 Conference Program and Schedule

Conference Program and Schedule

FINAL

 

Sunday, July 13, 2008

Pre-conference workshops more details...

09:00 - 11:00 Key Tools for Doing Systems Science, Len Troncale. Room: Inn Wisconsin

09:00 - 17:00 Fundamentals of Relational Science: Building a Curriculum, John Kineman and Judith Rosen. Room: Old Madison East

13:00 - 17:00 Introducing a System of Systems Processes (SOSP), Len Troncale. Room: Inn Wisconsin

 

13:00 - 18:00 Registration, Annex Room, Memorial Union Lobby

18:00 - 20:00 Reception, Main Lounge, Memorial Union

 

Monday, July 14, 2008

08:00 - 18:00 Registration, Annex Room, Memorial Union Lobby

08:00 - 09:00 ISSS Roundtable, Capitol View Room, 4th Floor

09:00 - 09:30 Conference Opening, Gary Metcalf: The Science and the Perspective of Systems (1069), Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

09:30 - 10:15 Bobby Milstein, Centers for Disease Control: Crafting a Health System that Protects us All: Syndemics, Simulation Scenarios, and Social Change (1061)

10:15 - 10:45 Coffee Break, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

10:45 - 11:30 David Schwartz, U. of WI, Genomics: Plunge of the New Biology into Complexity (1033)

11:30 - 12:15 Manfred Drack, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Sciences: von Bertalanffy Lecture: Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s Early System Approach (1031)

12:30 - 13:30 Lunch, Great Hall, 4th Floor

13:30 - 15:00 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Evolutionary Development SIG: Applied Systems and Development SIG: Hierarchy Theory SIG: Agent-based Social Simulation; Systems Modeling and Simulation ROOM OPEN
Chairs: Alexander and Kathia Laszlo Chair: Dennis Finlayson Chair: Jennifer Wilby Chair: Takehiro Inohara  
Introduction and Discussion for Evolutionary Development 1008 (no paper) Human Rights Revisited: Reciprocity, Stakeholders, Lifecycles and Systemic Issues?
Finlayson, Dennis Edward
 
885 (894) A Business Model Architecture: Observation Problems and Solutions in Modelling Businesses and their Networks
Shaw, Duncan Robert
 
964 (1007) Preservation of Misperceptions: Stability Analysis of Hypergames
Sasaki, Yasuo; Kijima, Kyoichi
 
 
1055 (no paper) Leaders of Change: Social Entrepreneurship and the Creation of Ecologies of Solutions
Castro Laszlo, Kathia
 1049 (no paper) Design for an Assessment of Gaining Access to the International Interoperability Systems in the Bid for Secession
Solomons, Leonie Marilynne
931 (no paper) Coevolving Open Source Business Models and Private Source Business Models
Ing, David
 
921 (no paper) Methodology toward a Model of Earthquake Prediction
Patino-Ortiz, Julian; Badillo-Pina, Isaias Jose; Patino-Ortiz, Miguel
 
 

994 (1077) Co-Creating Living Systems that Thrive on Diversity
Lewis, Nancy; Moore, B; Southern, Nancy

 928 (no paper) Slum Communities as Complex Adaptive Systems: Using Complexity Science to Inform an Adaptive Ecosystem Approach to Environment and Health in Informal Settlements in Chennai, India
Bunch, Martin Joseph; Franklin, Beth; Morley, David; Romona, Gananathan
916 (1006) The Hard Facts of Soft Social Systems: A General Systems Explanatory Model for Schools and Workplaces
Gabriele, Susan Farr
 
969 (974) Architecture Case Study in Transformity Factorization
Collins, Dennis Glenn

 
 

 15:00 - 15:30 Coffee Break, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

15:30 - 17:30 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Evolutionary Development SIG: Health Systems SIG: Hierarchy Theory SIG: Living Sytems Analysis; What is Life and Living? SIG: Special SABI panel:  Conversation on globalization and localization
Chairs: Alexander and Kathia Laszlo Chair: Ockie Bosch Chair: Jennifer Wilby Chair: Jim Simms Chair: David Ing 
915 (1075) Toward a Description of the Consciousness Field
Ordunez-Zavala, Enrique; Badillo-Pina, Isaias Jose; Peon-Escalante, Ignacio
866 (973) A Difficult Balance:  Decisions in Health Care
Metcalf, Marilyn A
1057 (no paper) Complexity, Global Climate Change and Soil Carbon Cycling: Factors Controlling the Temperature Response of Microbial Decomposition
Wixon, Devin
 
904 (905) A Service Science Perspective
Swanson, G.A
 
Proposed trigger question: What can we expect in social systems and economies as the world simultaneously seems to be becoming global (with free trade, information and communication technologies) and becoming local (as supplies of energy, soil and water have become stressed)?
934 (no paper) How Do We Know? How Do We Acquire Wisdom? A Systemic Classification of Knowledge
Aceves, Francisco Javier; Alvarado, Jesus; Tejeida-Padilla, Ricardo
 
1042 (1048) Measuring the Inequity of a Health System: A Systems Perspective - Systematic Analytical Mapping Approach
Ngana, Jean-Paul
1040 (no paper) Scenarios Addressing United Parcel Service’s Energy Acquisition: A Methodology for Performing a Comparative Analysis of Alternative Fuels
Pease, Megan
 
1050 (no paper) A Status Report on the Development of Living Systems Science
Simms, James Robert
 
 
  955 (no paper) Real Life or Death Application of System Theory: The 2000 Years Daily Decision Making Experience of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners EC
Leung Wong, Thomas Sui; Yan Huang, E C
1074 (no paper) A Systems Perspective On Ecological Restoration: Should The Current Historic Climax-Community Restoration Model Be Replaced By A Future Oriented Dynamic Ecosystem Based Model
Thomforde, Stephen L
 
1039 (1046) Fundamentals of Relational Complexity Theory
Kineman, John
 
    Sandbox
Tim Allen
 910 (990) Are Ecosystems Alive?
Vesterby, Vincent
 

17:30 - 18:00  Presentation by the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR). Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

18:00 - 19:30  ISSS Board Meeting, Inn Wisconsin West

19:30 - 21:00  Past Presidents Fireside Chat with Student SIG, Reception Room, 4th floor

 

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

08:00 - 18:00 Registration, Annex Room, Memorial Union Lobby

08:00 - 09:00 ISSS Roundtable, Capitol View Room, 4th Floor

09:00 - 09:15 Conference Updates, Gary Metcalf, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

09:15 - 10:00 Steve Carpenter, U. of WI, Zoology: Scenario Thinking to Solve Complex Environmental Problems (1064)

10:00 - 10:45 Jon Foley, U. of WI, Sustainability and Global Environment: Living on a Shrinking Planet:  Challenges and Opportunities for a Sustainable Future (1070)

10:45 - 11:00 Coffee Break, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

11:00 - 11:45 David Waltner-Toews, University of Guelph, Population Medicine: The Ecosystem Approach: Complexity, Uncertainty and Managing for Sustainability (1072)

11:45 - 12:15 Poster Session, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

12:15 - 13:00 Council Meeting, Reception Room, 4th Floor

12:30 - 13:30 Lunch, Great Hall, 4th Floor

13:30 - 15:00 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Evolutionary Development SIG: Designing Educational Systems SIG: Research towards General Theories of Systems SIG: Systems Modeling and Simulation ROOM OPEN
Chairs: Alexander and Kathia Laszlo Chair: Sue Gabriele Chair: Lynn Rasmussen Chair: Takehiro Inohara  
925 (1025) Toward a Unified Field Theory of Human Behaviour (Global Cultural Evolution)
Abundis, Marcus
924 (981) E-Teaching: Eroding the Stronghold of Teachers
Chroust, Gerhard
 
982 (989) Adapting Banathy's Systems View of Education to a Systems View of Human Systems
Rasmussen, Lynn
 
900 (947) A Systems-Theoretical Representation of Technologies and their Connections
Inohara, Takehiro
 
 
875 (1021) Being Values and Beneficent Obsessions: Applying Theories from Maslow and Assagioli to Evolutionary Guidance Media
Klisanin, Dana
952 (954) Using Systems Thinking and Social Network Theory to Improve Children's Mathematical Problem Solving Skills
Pinzon-Salcedo, Luis; Barros, Ricardo; Zarama, Roberto; de Meza, Margarita; Carulla, Cristina; Bejarano, Astrid
996 (997) Operating Principle of the Uni-Versity
Mandel, Thomas
 
929 (1013) Analysis On Trust Game by Reciprocal Agents
Okayasu, Hidetoshi
 
 
884 (958) Evolutionary Ethics: Vision and Values for a World of Insurmountable Opportunities
Laszlo, Alexander

 
980 (998) The System of Systems Processes
Brian Hilton
 
909 (971) A Viable System Model Approach to Enterprise Resources Planning Systems
Badillo, Isaias Jose; Tejeida-Padilla, Ricardo; Morales-Matamoros, Oswaldo
 
 

 15:00 - 15:30 Coffee Break and ISSS Membership Meeting, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

15:30 - 17:30 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Evolutionary Development    SIG: Environment/ Sustainable Systems SIG: Foundations of Information Systems and Information Systems Design Complex Systems Special SABI panel:  Conversation on the information revolution / services revolution in business
Chairs: Alexander and Kathia Laszlo Chair: TBC Chair: Jed Jones Chair: Tim Allen Chair: David Ing
919 (no paper) Social Implications of a Partial Privatization of the Mexican Petroleum Industry
Avalos-Villarreal, Elvira
959 (961) Holistic Method for Developing Risk Maps in Rural Zones
Aceves, Francisco J.; Audefroy, Joel F.; Peon, Ignacio E.
 
977 (1023) A Systems Approach to Streamlining the Creation of Web-Based Content
Jones, Jed C.
 
927 (no paper) Resource Use, Economic Transformation, and Transportation: A Case Study in Southern Wisconsin
Allen, Peter; Allen, Timothy F.H
 
Proposed trigger question:  How much have learned about the "new economy" associated with the "information revolution" or "services revolution", and what don't we yet know? 
 906 (970) A Systems Sciences Approach to the Design of a Municipal Integration Model for Sustainable Tourist Development. Case: The Orient Zone of Mexico State
Tejeida-Padilla, Ricardo; Badillo-Pina, Isaias; Vargas-Castro, Juan Carlos
914 (no paper) Climate and the San Luis Valley: Changes in Growing Season and Temperature
Mix, Ken
 
1029 (1030) A Basic Principle for the Architecture of Computer-Based Information Processing
Kampfner, Roberto R
877 (no paper) Integration Science: Reconciling the Boundaries of Humans and Nature
Lucio Lopes, Vicente
 
 
991 (999) Systemics and the Mutually Binding Economy Networks: A Knowledge-Based Approach for Sustainable Communities
Teissier-Fuentes, Honorato C.; Mendoza-Santillan, J. Gabriel
873 (no paper) Assessing Adaptive Capacity in an Urbanizing Watershed
Vogl, Adrian L; Roberts, Susan; Fotinos, Timothy A; Klier, Joh
913 (949) Digital Democracy and Citizenship as the Democratic Political Systems for the Information Age
Cho, Ilsoo
 
951 (960) Negotiating Social Complexity
Bausch, Ken
 
 
   1018 (1054) Backstage of the Global Climate Change: A System that No-one Thinks to Himself
Frias, Ricardo Andres; Gessaga, Tariana Maia; Rabassa, Jorge Oscar

887 (1000) Application of a Model of Planning for the Continuous Improvement of the Development of the  Telecommunications Vega, Cirilo Leon

872 (no paper) Entropy Debt: A Link to Sustainability?
von Schilling, Caroline; Straussfogel, Debra
 
 

 

Evening Dinner Get-together: hosted by Tim Allen, details to follow.

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2008

08:00 - 15:00 Registration, Annex Room, Memorial Union Lobby

07:45 - 09:00 ISSS Roundtable, Capitol View Room, 4th Floor

09:00 - 10:30 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Organisatiional Transformation and Social Change SIG: Applied Systems and Development SIG: SABI session on DIALOGUE SIG: Spirituality and Systems SIG: Living Systems  Theory
Chair: Tamar Zohar Harel Chair: Dennis Finlayson Chair: Jed Jones Chair: Thomas Wong  Chair: Jim Simms
876 (895) Social Responsibility: An Innovation of Ethic Toward Requisite Holism as a Basis for Humans to Make a Difference in Affluence
Mulej, Matjaz; Potocan, Vojko; Zenko, Zdenka; Knez-Riedl, Jozica; Hrast, Anita; Prosenak, Damjan
1011 (940) Korean Politics and Complex Systems Theory
Sim, Youn-Soo
 
926 (983) Dialogue and Ecological Engineering in Social Systems Design
Metcalf, Gary
1037 (1047) How to Look across the Room
Ong, John Nathan
 
Special Workshop 9 am to 10:30 am on Living Systems Science and Science of Society Workshop 4 more details...
930 (979) Searching for Ourselves: A Methodological Exploration of a Soft System Dynamics Method as a Social Learning Tool for Watershed Implementation Planning
Brown, Stephan Edward
946 (1002) What's the North Korean Nuclear Weapons' Future?
Kwon, Hyuk Kihl
932 (1022) Business Models and Evolving Economic Paradigms: A Systems Science Approach
Ing, David
992 (no paper) The System and Control Theory in the Vipassana Meditation of the Noble Eightfold Path as Taught by Buddha: Understanding Meditation with the Taichi Yin-Yang System in Modern Terminologies
Leung Wong, Thomas Sui; Yan Huang, E C
 continues...
957 (no paper) How Would Asian Government Emerge through the Electronic Moneys of Private Institutions?
Takahashi, Kazuyuki Ikko
 
    889 (938) The Traditional Morality of Totalitarianism: Juche Ideology Through Hyo
Park, Chul Ho
 continues...

 

10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break and Poster Session, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

11:00 - 12:30 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Organisatiional Transformation and Social Change Special Session: New Economic Systems SIG: Systems Applications to Business and Industry SIG: Duality ROOM OPEN
Chair: Ignacio Peon Escalente Chair: Sally Goerner Chair: David Ing Chair: Luis Sancho  
937 (no paper) Self, Organization and Self-Organization within Social Organizations. How Knowing The Difference Makes a Difference in Appreciating Common Denominators: The Case of Self Regulation
Zohar Harel, Tamar
1009 (no paper) The New Science of Sustainability: Implications for Economic Theory and Practice
Goerner, Sally
1014 (no paper) Meaningful Measurement in the Contemporary Enterprise
Kosits, Marianne

859 Gender Duality: informative women, energetic men
Luis Sancho

 
1004 (1005) Evolving to Sustainability
Li, Jon
Roundtable Discussion:
Dorothy Lageroos, Sally Goerner and Jennifer Wilby

869 (893) Systems Thinking for Team and Organisational Learning: Case of Performance Measure Conflicts in a Multinational Supply Chain
Maani, Kambiz E.; Fan, Annie

860 Temporal information: the arrow of Einstein, the arrow of Evolution
Luis Sancho

 
1016 (1024) Are Organizational Size and Efficiency Engaged?
Frias, Ricardo Andres; Barrera, Ricardo
  899 (967) Audit Support Plug-In System by the Use of Ontology Model
Minegishi, Junya; Gehrmann, Andreas; Nagai, Yoshimitsu; Ishizu, Syohei
   

 

12:30 - 13:30 Lunch, Great Hall, 4th Floor

 

12:30              Field Trip 1: Taliesin, Frank Lloyd Wright's home and studio tour. Airconditioned coach, box lunches, coach and tour, $75 per person. Limited to 20 people.

12:30              Field Trip 2: Ecology field trip with Tim Allen: out into the wilds of Wisconsin, buffet lunch as usual and then at 13:30 onto bus, $15 per person. Limited to 30 people.

14:00              Field Trip 3: Tour of the Laboratory for Molecular and Computational Genomics, on the campus at Madison, hosted by David C. Schwartz, the Director and Principle Investigator, no charge, after lunch meet in Main Lounge at 13:30 p.m.   Limited to 15 people.

 

Thursday, July 17, 2008

08:00 - 18:00 Registration, Annex Room, Memorial Union Lobby

08:00 - 09:00 ISSS Roundtable, Capitol View Room, 4th Floor

09:00 - 09:15 Conference Updates, Gary Metcalf, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

09:15 - 10:00 David Hawk, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Management and Architecture: The Business Educators Dilemma: Teaching Analytics to those who Strive to Manage Systems (1058)

10:00 - 10:45 Bill Rouse, Georgia Institute of Technology, Industrial and Systems Engineering and College of Computing: Modeling & Managing Complex Systems: A Case Study of Healthcare Delivery (1060)

10:45 - 11:00 Coffee Break, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

11:00 - 11:45 Doug McDavid, IBM Almaden Research Center, Executive Research Consultant: Sociable Technologies for Enterprising Sociality (1059)

11:45 - 12:30 ISSS Membership Meeting, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

12:30 - 13:30 Lunch, Great Hall, 4th Floor

13:30 - 15:00 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Organisatiional Transformation and Social Change SIG: Metamodeling and Systems Epistemology SIG: Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG: Critical Systems Theory ROOM OPEN
Chair: Tamar Zhoar Harel   Chair: Janet McIntyre Chair: David Ing  Chair: Pamela Buckle  
1026 (1027) Informing the Consumer is Strengthening the Economy
Gabriele, Anthony
 936 (1001) Systems of Things That Flow
Al-Fedaghi, Sabah Saleh
 863 (no paper) Idealized Design: An "Open Innovation" Process for Successful Business Model Creation
Pourdehnad, John
886 (939) "You Are Adapting More to Me Than I Am Adapting to You" (But What Does More Mean?):  Cybernetic and Foucaultian Explorations of the Domain of Power
Guddemi, Phillip V  
 
907 (993) Bureau-Pathologies in Public Organizations: Synthesizing a Botanic Garden Case for a General Policy System Theory
Slawski, Carl
 868 (1028) Making a Difference through E-Government from Below: An Evaluation and Future Directions
McIntyre, Janet Judy
 903 (922) Failure of Foresight: Learning from System Failures through Dynamic Model
Nakamura, Takafumi; Kijima, Kyoichi
864 (1015) A Boundary Critique of Gender in the Project Management Body of Knowledge
Buckle Henning, Pamela; Thomas, Janice
 
945 (984) Systemic Metamethodology for Methods Design
Peon-Escalante, Ignacio Enrique; Aceves, Francisco Javier; Badillo, Isaias Jose
 
 874 (968) The "Cosmo-Planetary and Terrestrial Meta-Dynamics Systemicity"
Blanc, Jean-Jacques
 858 (1003) Incorporating Systems Thinking in Organizational Change Projects Using Action Research By Practitioners Conducting Academic Research
Sankaran, Shankar
1035 (no paper) Structure/Process as Ontology for Critical Systems Thinking & Practice
Bowers, Todd David
 
 
 

 

15:00 - 15:30 Coffee Break, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

15:30 - 17:30 Paper Sessions

Stream 1: Inn Wisconsin East Stream 2: Inn Wisconsin West Stream 3: Old Madison East Stream 4: Old Madison West Stream 5: Reception Room
SIG: Aging Systems; Human Systems Inquiry; Women and Children    Information Systems Design and Information Technology SIG: Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG: Research towards General Theories of Systems ROOM OPEN
 Chair: Daniel Hershey  Chair: Ockie Bosch  Chair: David Ing  Chair: Lynn Rasmussen  
901 (no paper) Entropy Theory of Aging Systems: Humans; Corporations; and the Universe
Hershey, Daniel
878 (995) Technology Acceptance in Libraries: A Systemic Approach
Quijano-Solis, Alvaro
972 (975) Symbiosis as a Metaphor for Sustainability Practice in Human Affairs
Leonard, Allenna
865 (871) A Novel Approach to the Concept of System Information
Yahyavi, Mehdi
 
898 (no paper) Exploring Organisational Paradigms: Systemic Inquiry Revisited
Klein, Louis
911 (963) Ontology-Driven Decision Support Systems for Management System Audit
Syohei, Ishizu; Gehrmann, Andreas; Minegishi, Junya; Nagai, Yoshimitsu
948 (966) Growth Strategy and Hierarchy Theory: Emergence of Super-Players in the Healthcare Computed Tomography Oligopoly
Galbrun, Jerome; Kijima, Kyoichi
1067 (no paper) Finding Linkage Propositions between Systems Processes Troncale, Len  
1056 (no paper) Tacit Dimension of Soft Systems Approaches in Administrative Behavior
Yoshida, Taketoshi
917 (1012) After-Sales Service Parts Supply Chain System in OEM Telecommunication Firms
Morales-Matamoros, Oswaldo; Flores-Cadena, Mauricio; Tejeida-Padilla, Ricardo; Lina-Reyes, Ixchel
920 (1019) A Soft Systems Methodology Approach to Design a Restaurant Management Model for a Great Tourism Hotel
Briones-Juarez, Abraham; Tejeida-Padilla, Ricardo; Morales-Matamoros, Oswaldo
1068 (no paper) Defining Systems Diseases Using Systems Pathology Troncale, Len  
867 (988) Cannibalizing Childhood's Future as Rising to Falling Rope
Robbins, Jeffrey H
 
1044 (no paper) New Models for Sustainable Fashion Industry System: A Case Study about Fashion Net Factories
Sbordone, Maria Antonietta
     

 

17:30 - 19:00 Break

19:00 - 22:00 Banquet, Memorial Union, Main Lounge, Memorial Union

 

Friday, July 18, 2008

08:00 - 13:00 Registration, Annex Room, Memorial Union Lobby

08:00 - 09:00 ISSS Roundtable, Capitol View Room, 4th Floor

09:00 - 09:10 Conference Updates, Gary Metcalf, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

09:10 - 09:25 Vickers Award Student Presentation

09:25 - 09:45 Jennifer Wilby, University of Hull, UK: Harnessing Complexity in Managing International Public Health Policy in The 21st Century (1036)

09:45 - 10:30 Tim Allen, University of Wisconsin, Botany Department, Incoming President ISSS: Confronting Economic Profit with Hierarchy Theory: The Concept of Gain in Ecology (1062)

10:30 - 10:45 Coffee Break, Tripp Commons, 2nd Floor

10:45 - 11:30 Jim Gustafson, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison: Vertical and Horizontal Scaling Strategies to Avoid Destruction in the Modern Contest: Riding Out the Perturbations of its Largest Scale, of the Seizing of High Gain/Cheap Energy and the Expensive Refining of Low Gain Energy, As Argued by Tim Allen and Colleagues (1071)

11:30 - 12:15 Speakers from UW Madison, Botany Department: Tim Allen's Sandpit
Megan Pease (1040), Peter Allen (927), Devin Wixon (1057), Steve Thomforde (1074)

12:15 - 13:00 Australian Presentation for ISSS2009

13:00  Conference Close

14:30 - 18:00 Connections Meeting, Langdon Room, 4th Floor

 

Saturday, July 19, 2008

9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Connections Meeting, Langdon Room, 4th Floor

Madison 2008 Pre-Conference Workshops

Workshop 1

KEY TOOLS FOR DOING SYSTEMS SCIENCE

TOOLS FOR INTEGRATION & SYNTHESIS RULES FOR ABSTRACTION & DEABSTRACTION

Led by: Professor Len Troncale

Sunday, July 13th, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Integration and Synthesis are among the most recognized and honored of intellectual achievements. Everything from radically successful entrepreneurs in business, industry, and engineering to Nobel prizes in the natural and economic sciences depends on new integration and synthesis. But while we honor and reward such accomplishments, we do not have an acceptable and consensus toolbox of techniques for integration and synthesis. In fact, synthesis and integration are not serious topics in our curricula at any level. If it is so crucial, why are integration and synthesis not taught anywhere?

The goal of this 2-hour Workshop will be to diagnose this problem and present a series of practical tools and techniques to do synthesis and integration in any field. During the Workshop, we will cover the much neglected, but powerful tool of General Morphology introduced by Fritz Zwicky at Caltech. This tool is relevant to systems theory and demonstrated practicality in a range of engineering applications.

Some of the topics that will be discussed will include:

 

  • What is integration or synthesis? How can we recognize it?
  • Listing of specific techniques for integration and synthesis
  • Obstacles to, or human limitations for, integration and synthesis
  • Specific Rules of Abstraction and examples
  • Specific Rules for De-abstraction and case studies
  • Great boundary crossers of the past: instructive examples of synthesis from history?
  •  

    Presenter: Dr. Len Troncale was Managing Director of the ISSS for nearly ten years, and then ISSS President. He has been on the Boards of the IFSR, and WISINET and on the Editorial Boards of several systems journals. He was Director of the Institute for Advanced Systems Studies for 30 years and author of systems science curricula. Professor Emeritus of Biology.

    Method: Fifteen minutes of intense ppt presentation on each of the above topics will be followed by fifteen minutes of open discussion by the group on that topic continuing until the time is exhausted. PPts will be distributed to participants. A major Workshop goal is to stimulate international collaboration to continue work on integration of GTS’s between annual conferences and enable cooperation in disseminating SSP across the many new systems conference venues.

    Fee: $15, payable at the event

    Venue: Look for signs in ISSS Registration area. Receipts will be available for use as educational or business tax deduction. RSVP to lrtroncale@csupomona.edu of intent to attend so appropriate numbers of handouts can be printed.

    Workshop 2

    FUNDAMENTALS OF RELATIONAL SCIENCE: BUILDING A CURRICULUM

    Led by: John Kineman and Judith Rosen

    Sunday, July 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    This workshop will focus on foundational concepts in the emerging field of relational science. As a group, we will review the basic assumptions of this science, which were derived primarily from the work of Dr. Robert Rosen, mathematical biologist and former ISSS president. The workshop will go beyond Rosen's development, following his many hints and leads, to establish a clear and teachable set of ideas at the foundation of a new science. This new science is the sceince and analysis of relational entailments and how they construct the natural world. While most of Rosen's work was focused on applications in biology, and addressing the question "What is Life", what he discovered in terms of the nature of complexity turns out to be revolutionary in that it applies to all of science, underlying even physics. It provides a different mode of analysis than traditional quantitative and state-based concepts. Accordingly it is not itself predictive of states but of system types. These, in turn, can identify constraints on quantitative analysis and prediction. In this way, the relational view does not contradict mechanistic science, but instead it provides a broader conceptual and analytical framework in which new phenomena can be investigated. In this one-day experimental workshop, we will introduce the basic assumptions of this world view, showing where they come from, and we will explore various implications. As a group we will discuss specific definitions of terms and evaluate specific epistemological criteria. The main goal of the workshop is to begin a collaborative, community approach to pursuing and developing this theory, as was done in the very successful development of mechanistic theory. By focusing on education and simplifying concepts appropriately for that, we believe we can make rapid initial progress. All ISSS participants are welcome to participate. The only prerequisite is the willingness to begin with a basic working assumption that nature can be described entirely in terms of natural  modeling relations. We will work from that premise to its logical implications.

    The importance of this work, aside from providing science with new tools to study poorly understood complex phenomena, is also to provide a counter perspective to current mechanistic models that are inadvertently transferred to society and perceptions of our future. The original memo suggesting this workshop expressed concern that an alternative voice must attain sufficient strength to challenge current views that have been popularized, that huan agency can design not only our own future, but the future of all life on Earth, controlling evolution according to human interests. It is clear that as long as we continue to believe that nature is fundamentally mechanical our models for enacting such control over our natural world will be seriously flawed. Furthermore, these same models guide and condition our management and governance approaches, ensuring that we will not have sufficient understanding for ethical decision-making. Many people have said that we must find a new paradigm in science, because science does drive Western society, and that this new science must be broad enough to afford clear integration of living and non-living phenomena. We believe that relational theory and a relational science that we can now articulare, can at least begin this process.

    Workshop Coordinators: Dr. John J. Kineman, Ph.D. and Mrs. Judith Rosen
    Email contact: john.kineman 'at ' colorado.edu
    Phone contact: 303-443-7544

    Workshop 3

    INTRODUCING A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS PROCESSES (SSP)

    General Theory, Research Potential, Tools for Use

    Led by: Professor Len Troncale

    Sunday, July 13, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

    How many schools of thought or candidate general theories of system can you name? These are the knowledge base for the ISSS; they should be the source of many insights and guidelines for applications to solve complex systems problems. We (of the ISSS) should be more informed than anyone about all the alternatives that are available, and what are the strengths and weaknesses of each theory or approach.

    The System of Systems Processes general theory is an attempted synthesis of many other candidate general theories and techniques. This 4-hour workshop will present a concise summary of the following features of this comprehensive school of thought:

     

  • Tenets and Special Contributions of the SSP vis a vis General Theories of Systems & Praxis
  • Criteria for selecting Systems Processes (and eliminating non-)
  • The relation between Structure and Process, and Isomorphies
  • Listing of 100+ Systems Processes
  • What should be known about each Systems Process with examples
  • Comparison of systems processes covered in different “candidate” theories (includes take-home matrix)
  • Critical Importance of Knowing Specific Mutual Influences Between Systems Processes
  • Types, Classes, and Exemples of Linkage Propositions
  • Matrix of Hundreds of Case Studies of Systems Processes in Seven Natural Sciences: Proof of Isomorphy
  • Discinyms & Discriminations across Systems Processes; How they lead to confusion
  • Computerized Tools to Enable Group Collaboration and Use of the SSP
  •  

    Presenter: Dr. Len Troncale was Managing Director of the ISSS for nearly ten years, and then ISSS President. He has been on the Boards of the IFSR, and WISINET and on the Editorial Boards of several systems journals. He was Director of the Institute for Advanced Systems Studies for 30 years and author of systems science curricula. Professor Emeritus of Biology.

    Method: Fifteen minutes of intense ppt presentation on each of the above topics will be followed by fifteen minutes of open discussion by the group on that topic continuing until the time is exhausted. A major workshop goal is to stimulate international collaboration to continue work on integration of GTS’s between annual conferences and enable cooperation in disseminating SSP across the many new systems conference venues.

    Fee: $60 payable at the door. Look for signs in ISSS Registration area.

    RSVP: Please notify lrtroncale@csupomona.edu of intent to attend so appropriate numbers of handouts can be printed.

     

    Workshop 4

    LIVING SYSTEMS SCIENCE AND SCIENCE OF SOCIETY

    Wednesday 16th July: 9 am to 10:30 am

    Reception Room

    The workshop describes the developments, to date, of a natural science for living systems, which includes the science of society. A timeline is presented that chronicles advances in the development of a science of society.  These developments include: (1) proof that living systems science is a natural science with the same characteristics of the existing natural sciences, (2) describes the objective measures that make living systems a natural science, (3) demonstrates that living systems science is at the stage physics was in the 1680s when Newton published Principia, and (4) proof that the fundamental principles of a natural science of society exist. Future developments of the science of society are a subject for discussion.

     

    Madison 2008 Wednesday Afternoon Tours

    For all tours, contact Nancy in the Madison Conference Office at isss2008@union.wisc.edu to book a tour option.

    TOUR ONE

    WISCONSIN ECOLOGY FIELD TRIP

    PROFESSOR TIM ALLEN

    COST $15

    Leaves Memorial Union at 13:30 prompt

    PLEASE BRING EXTRA BOTTLED WATER FOR THIS TRIP!

    Wisconsin is one of the best described vegetations in the world, thanks to the work of Curtis and his students four decades ago and a continuing research effort.  Our trip will walk some 2 miles to Hemlock draw in the Baraboo hills, one of the oldest ranges in the world (1.5 billion years).  That region was unglaciated.  Southern Wisconsin is now too warm for Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) but populations from glacial times survive on cool north facing slopes deep in the forest, hundreds of miles south of the species' normal present habitat.  We will see new forests on Southern slopes and cool moist northern forests on north slopes.  We will see sea stack cliffs a billion years old, remerged from the being buried in sedimentary rocks.  Recent storm damage is impressive but Hemlock Draw remains a spiritual place. We will also see a historic shot tower, and a sand prairie near conservationist Aldo Leopold's shack (Sand County Almanac is his classic work).

    Timothy F. H. Allen

    Botany Dept, 430 Lincoln Drive

    University of Wisconsin

    Madison WI 53706-1381

    tfallen@wisc.edu for additional details.

    TOUR TWO

    TALIESIN: TOUR OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S HOUSE AND PERSONAL STUDIO    

    COST $75

    Meet outside the Memorial Union front doors no later than 12:25 p.m. to travel by air-conditioned coach to Taliesin. The cost covers the coach travel and tour tickets. Box lunches should be picked up from the Buffet area before coming to the coach. Be prompt, the coach will leave on time at 12:30 p.m. to make sure we meet the timing for the Taliesin tour schedule.

    Your group will travel scenic rural roads as they tour Frank Lloyd Wright’s home, underscored with lively commentary from a professional, knowledgeable guide. Taliesin, the most personal of Wright’s masterpieces, was constructed of simple, inexpensive materials – limestone and sandstone quarried nearby, plaster, and wood. Wright built the house over 48 years, and never stopped adding to it or changing it until he died. Often described as more of a village on a hill than a home, the house seems to grow from the site, with vistas of the surrounding countryside to the east and an intimate hill garden to the west. The tour at Taliesin takes two hours.

    One of the many highlights your group will enjoy is the 28’x36’ living room, a masterful interplay of vertical and horizontal spaces, flooded with light from banks of windows overlooking the valley and water gardens below. Next to the house, connected to it by a covered breezeway, is Wright’s 24’x30’ personal studio.

    What to Expect: This fascinating tour winds through a picturesque rural estate and has some unique characteristics. We share this information so that all guests will understand what to expect during the course of the tour.

    • Your coach will have to park at the base of a hill and your group must climb a gravel driveway to the House.
    • The tour entails a significant amount of STANDING, STAIR CLIMBING, and WALKING on uneven terrain.
    • The tour is up to 2 hours of mostly standing and walking with no opportunity to leave the group should you wish to stay behind.

    Dress: The tour goes on, rain or shine. Please dress appropriately for the weather. Wear comfortable walking shoes.

    Further details from isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com

     

    TOUR THREE

    GENOMICS LAB VISIT

    LED BY: PROFESSOR DAVID SCHWARTZ

    There is no cost for this tour.

    Meet in the Memorial Union, Main Lounge, to be escorted over at 13:30.

    We have the opportunity for up to 15 people to visit the Laboratory for Molecular and Computational Genomics, right on the campus at Madison, hosted by David C. Schwartz, the Director and Principle Investigator. 

    The human genome is formidably complex, consisting of over 3 billion basepairs. Efforts to sequence and to ultimately understand the function of all 100,000 genes has been a major focus of the Human Genome Initiative. Only recently has the genomics community come to grips with the need to analyze in detail, large numbers of individuals in terms of detailed sequence information and careful annotation. Unfortunately, the physical and computational means to accomplish these goals are rather nascent.

    Our laboratory is developing genome analysis approaches based on using individual DNA molecules as the main substrate for our analysis. Remarkably, single DNA molecules can be readily imaged using fluorescence microscopy. Developments in our laboratory have enabled the biochemical analysis of individual DNA molecules that we fix in large numbers to positively charged surfaces. An automated system combining image analysis and map construction algorithms (Optical Mapping), enables construction of high-resolution restriction maps from a variety of DNA sources. Using large DNA molecules directly extracted from genomes, Optical mapping generated whole genome maps of several microorganisms, including Deinocccus radiodurans, Plasmodium falciparum, and several strains of E. coli.

    Recent accomplishments have included the mapping of over 60% of the human genome. Such maps are useful scaffolds for sequence assembly, and point the way to large-scale genome analysis of large populations.

    Further details from isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com


    Madison 2008 Conference Registration

    Registration for the 52nd Annual Meeting of the ISSS, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, July 13-18, 2008.

  • On-line conference registration will be managed using the University of Wisconsin, Madison, registration system. This is now available at Conference Registration. Off-line paper registrations (by post and fax) will still be available through contact with the ISSS office.
  • On-line hotel reservation is available through Conference Registration. For a description of accommodation offered through the registration website, please see: Madison Accommodation.
  • Once you have completed registration, to print an invoice, please see: Print Invoice
  • If you need to make an additional payment to complete registration for the conference or accommodation, please see: Make Additional Payment
  • If you require a letter in support of a visitor's US Visa Application to attend this conference, please contact the ISSS Office at 2008cnf@dsl.pipex.com for further information. Please Note: the automated visa letter function for the conference has been withdrawn.
  • Preparing and Submitting Abstracts and Papers for ISSS Madison 2008

    The deadline for submission of abstracts is May 1, 2008.

    Abstracts submitted after this date and before May 10 will be considered for inclusion in the program on a space-available basis.

    Authors submitting abstracts and papers to the conference Journals site, written using Microsoft Word, must save those submissions in Office 97-2003 or earlier. Office 2007 versions will not be accepted due to compatability issues for reviewers.

    Papers accepted for presentation will be compiled on a CDROM and distributed at the conference.

    The deadline for submission of full papers is May 10, 2008.  (Late papers received after May 10 may still be accepted to the conference, but they are included on the CD-ROM proceedings for the subsequent year.)

    Introduction

    Since 1998, the conference proceedings have been published on CD-ROM with an ISBN. Also, for the third year, the conference proceedings will again be published on-line through the Journals website.

    To submit abstracts and papers, please follow these instructions step-by-step and if you have any problems contact the ISSS office at 2008 'at' dsl.pipex.com

    Submission to the JournalsISSS web site:

    Each author should log in to and register on the JournalsISSS website. http://journals.isss.org/index.php/proceedings52nd

    If you were registered last year, you can go directly to the Login area at the right hand side of the page and use the login name and password from last year.

    If you are a new user, click on the Register heading at the top of the page and fill in the requested information.

    Once you have registered and logged in to the Journals site you can then upload your abstract or paper. The steps to submit your abstract or paper are described in the section “Submitting Your Abstract and Paper to JournalsISSS”, below.

    The topics of interest to the ISSS Madison 2008 meeting are described in the Call for Participation, and more specifically, the Calls for Papers that detail the specific SIG calls for papers. In addition, Guidance on the Style of Abstracts and Papers for Annual ISSS Meetings can be consulted.

    Preparing Abstracts for ISSS Madison 2008

     Here are step-by-step instructions on preparing your abstract for the conference.

    1.  Click **this link to open the ISSS template for abstracts**. Download the file to your computer.
    2.  Open the ISSS template using Microsoft Word. Authors submitting abstracts to the conference Journals site, written using Microsoft Word, must save those submissions in Office 97-2003 or earlier. Office 2007 versions will not be accepted due to compatability issues for reviewers.
    3.  Save the document under a name that includes the surname of the lead author, e.g. 2008ISSSAuthor1.doc
    4.  Using the template as an example, delete out or write over the sample text. Use the built in styles, including:

    • Title
    • Author
    • Address
    • Body text (for paragraph text)
    • Abstracts SHOULD NOT exceed 600 words

    5.  Resist using:

    • Underscores
    • Figures and tables in the abstract
    • Content that requires references at the end of the abstract
    • Footnotes
    • Font size changes.
    • No internal headings
    • Colors

    6. Log in to the Journals website. Follow the 5-step instructions for uploading the abstract file as detailed below.

    When you upload your abstract, there is a checklist of requirements that you should meet, including agreement with submitting your work under the Creative Commons License.

    Submitting Your Abstract on JournalsISSS

    1.  Log in at http://journals.isss.org with the userid and password that you had previously registered.
    2.  Under “Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the ISSS”, select the role of “Author”.
    3.  You should be on the “Active Submissions” page. Select “Step one of the submission process”.
    4.  On the “Step 1. Starting the Submission” page, …

    • Ensure that your abstract meets the criteria on the “Submission Checklist”, and tick each checkbox.
    • For the “Journal Section”, select the title of the SIG to which you wish to submit your abstract
    • Enter any comments you want to give to the editor about your submission, if any.
    • “Save and continue”.

    5.  Step 2: Entering the Submission's Metadata

    • Fill in the names and information for the author(s). Below the “Bio Statement” field, you can create additional fields by selecting the “Add Authors” button. If there is more than one author, be sure to designate the primary author using the button below that author's name.
    • Insert the working title in the “Title” field.
    • Under the Indexing section, specify at least two, and no more than five, keywords into the “Keywords” field.
    • Leave the Language box selected as “en” for English, unless special arrangements have been made with the Editor to submit in another language.
    • If there are supporting agencies for your work, list those in the appropriate fields.
    • Copy the text of the abstract into the abstract entry box in the submission page as well as uploading the electronic Word file in the next step.
    • “Save and continue.”

    6.  Step 3: Uploading the Abstract file

    • Follow the instructions on the page to attach your abstract to the JournalsISSS site.
    • DO NOT attach additional files for the abstract: you should not include figures or tables in your abstract.
    • “Save and continue.”


    7.  Step 4: Confirming the Submission

    • Under “File Summary”, verify that the correct file has been uploaded to the web site.
    • “Finish submission.”


    8.  You should receive e-mail notification on the progress of your abstract. To check at any time, you can log in and return to the “Active Submissions” page to see the status.

    Preparing and Submitting Papers for ISSS Madison 2008

    Here are step-by-step instructions on preparing and submitting your paper.

    1.  Click **this link to open the ISSS template for papers**. Download the file to your computer. A sample file is available for download so you can see the format applied to a full paper for reference. Authors submitting full papers to the conference Journals site, written using Microsoft Word, must save those submissions in Office 97-2003 or earlier. Office 2007 versions will not be accepted due to compatability issues for reviewers.

    The submission of a final paper, if your abstract is accepted to the conference, follows similar steps to submitting an abstract.

    2.  Sign in at http://journals.isss.org with the userid and password that you had previously registered.
    3.  Under “Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the ISSS”, select the role of “Author”.
    4.  You should be on the “Active Submissions” page. Click on "Step One of the Submission Process". DO NOT upload your paper as a supplemental file to your previous abstract submission.


    5.  On the “Step 1. Starting the Submission” page, …

    • Ensure that your paper meets the criteria on the “Submission Checklist”, and tick each checkbox.
    • For the “Journal Section”, select the category: Paper
    • Enter any comments you want to give to the editor about your submission, if any.
    • “Save and continue”.
    • DO NOT submit a PDF format file. Files must be submitted in an editable format or they will be returned to you for correction.


    6.  Step 2: Entering the Submission's Metadata

    • Fill in the names and information for the author(s). Below the “Bio Statement” field, you can create additional fields by selecting the “Add Authors” button. If there is more than one author, be sure to designate the primary author using the button below that author's name.
    • Insert the working title in the “Title” field.
    • Under the Indexing section, specify at least two, and no more than five, keywords into the “Keywords” field.
    • Leave the Language box selected as “en” for English, unless special arrangements have been made with the Editor to submit in another language.
    • If there are supporting agencies for your work, list those in the appropriate fields.
    • Copy the text of the abstract into the abstract entry box in the submission page as well as uploading the electronic Word file in the next step.
    • “Save and continue.”


    7.  Step 3: Uploading your Paper

    • Follow the instructions on the page to upload your paper to the JournalsISSS site.
    • “Save and continue.”


    8.  Step 4: Uploading Additional Supplementary Files

    • You can attach additional supplementary files, such as images or drawing files. Please note in the “Brief Description” box what the additional file contains.
    • “Save and continue.”


    9. Step 5: Confirming the Submission

    • Under “File Summary”, verify that the correct file has been uploaded to the web site.
    • “Finish submission.”


    10. You should receive e-mail notification on the progress of your paper. To check at any time, you can log in and return to the “Active Submissions” page to see the status.

    If you have any problems with this procedure, please contact the ISSS Office at: 2008 'at' dsl.pipex.com for help. 

    Creative Commons Licensing

    Formalization of Content Licensing with the Creative Commons:

    The ISSS approach to copyright of conference proceedings is in contrast to that of many other conferences. ISSS has never assumed the copyright on papers published in the proceedings. As a venue to develop new ideas and collaborate with other members, the ISSS encourages the contribution of content in many forms and at varying levels of completedness, ranging from early findings and through to nearly-completed research. Theoretical, empirical and applied works are welcomed. Most contributions would generally be classified as “working papers” distributed to peers for comments and discussion. Inclusion into the proceedings has neither required transfer of ownership from the original author, nor exclusivity. Thus, the copyright of the work has remained available for the author to assign to publishers of prestigious journals such as Systems Research and Behavioral Science. The ISSS board has recently approved the use of “Creative Commons Licensing” for the proceedings to formalise this policy and the details of CCL can be read below.

    The ownership and privileges of content contributed to past annual ISSS meetings has been vague. For this reason, although many authors have declared their interest in making their conference papers available on the ISSS web site, the ISSS had not been formally assigned the privileges of redistribution. In order to protect the rights of both authors and the ISSS, this ambiguity has now been clarified.

    The ISSS requests that you permit your work to published on the ISSS web site under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 license. This is the license that has been selected by the ISSS Board of Directors for all of the content on the ISSS web site, beginning in 2006. In a description of the features of this license,

    This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. Others can download and redistribute your work …, but they can also translate, make remixes, and produce new stories based on your work. All new work based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also be non-commercial in nature. (Source: “Meet the Licenses”, Creative Commons)

    This Creative Commons license has a deed, and a legal code associated with it. The license is not an alternative to your copyright, but instead, on top of your existing copyright. Your work is automatically copyrighted once it is put into tangible form (e.g. pressing the save button). This license is not mutually exclusive with other licenses that you may choose to place on your work. If you want to make money with the work, in another license with another party, that option is still open to you. If someone wants to make a different use of the work, (e.g. publishing it in a book), he or she is still obligated to contact you directly.

    When you submit your abstract and paper to JournalsISSS, an agreement to license the work under a Creative Commons license will appear as one of the checkboxes in the “Submission Checklist”. Checking off that box represents sufficient permission for the ISSS to post your abstract and paper on its web site.

     

    Madison 2008 Conference Announcement and Call for Participation

    Main Conference Theme

    Under the theme “Systems that Make a Difference”, the 52nd annual meeting of the ISSS will be held in Madison, Wisconsin from July 13 to 18, 2008.

    The title for this conference, Systems that Make a Difference, borrows from Gregory Bateson’s definition of information as “a difference that makes a difference.” The question for systems researchers and practitioners is, “what difference are we making?”

    The Challenge

    The modern systems movement draws upon a rich tradition developed by some of the best and brightest minds of the 20th and 21st centuries. Systems and cybernetic concepts have filtered into much of the scientific literature of the past five decades, and today systems-inspired words such as feedback, input/output, regulation, and interdependence have found their way into common language.

    And yet, the systems tradition itself appears to remain largely invisible as a body of knowledge to many of the scientists, academics, politicians and businesspeople who are making the decisions that deeply impact our collective social, economic, and ecological future. This represents a crucial opportunity for the systems community to make a difference in the world in ways that may matter most. Some questions naturally arise:
    • How can we as a community make systems concepts more accessible to decision makers and researchers in the larger global community?
    • How can members of the systems community apply the existing, rich knowledge base of systems concepts and methodologies toward making a positive, sustainable difference within our own spheres of influence?

    Toward Making a Difference

    The 52nd Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS 2008) will bring together professionals on the cutting-edge of the systems movement with influential decision makers facing far-reaching, real-world complexities on a daily basis. While we must continue to make systems theories and approaches ever more rigorous, to remain relevant we must also connect our work with the dilemmas in the world for which people are seeking solutions right now. The objective of ISSS 2008 is to further build much-needed bridges between rigor and relevance in systems work. Speakers and authors are invited to present who can address any part of this spectrum, from better methods for systems research to clarifying the nature of real-world problems in need of resolution.

    We encourage those interested in attending our event to register today and become a part of creating this important event.

    Confirmed Plenary Guest Speakers

    • Timothy F. H. Allen, President-elect, ISSS (2009) and Professor, Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin
    • Steve Carpenter, Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin
    • Manfred Drack, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science, Vienna, Austria
    • Jon Foley, Professor, Department of Sustainability and Global Environment, University of Wisconsin
    • David L. Hawk, Dean of the School of Management and Faculty in the New Jersey School of Architecture, New Jersey Institute of Technology
    • Doug McDavid, Executive Research Consultant, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA
    • Bobby Milstein, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Syndemics Prevention Network
    • Bill Rouse, Professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with a joint appointment in the College of Computing. Also, Fellow, International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) 2006 and recipient of the IBM Faculty Award in 2005 and 2006
    • David Schwartz, Professor, Chemistry and Genetics, University of Wisconsin
    • David Waltner-Toews, Professor, Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph and founding president of the Network for Ecosystem Sustainability and Health
    • Jennifer Wilby, Director of the Centre for Systems Studies and faculty member in Management Systems at the University of Hull, UK

    Call for Papers

    Although the conference will accept papers related to the following areas of research, the list is neither exclusive nor restrictive. Proposals of new sessions and tracks are very welcome, but should be submitted for consideration by March 1, 2008. Each session chair takes the final responsibility for running his/her session. All submitted papers are encouraged to state how relevant the paper is with regard to systems thinking, systems modeling and/or systems practice. The areas listed below have additional contact and content information listed on the specific SIG Calls for Papers page.

    Areas proposed by existing Special Integration Groups (SIGs) [click here for full contact details] and current exploratory groups:

    • Agent-based Social Systems Sciences
    • Aging Systems
    • Applied Systems & Development
    • Arts Based Inquiry
    • Daily Roundtable - please refer to the invitation by the Roundtable Coordinator
    • Designing Educational Systems
    • Duality Theory
    • Evolutionary Development
    • Foundations of Information Systems
    • Futurism & Systems Change
    • Hierarchy Theory
    • Human Systems Inquiry
    • Information Systems Design & Information Technology
    • Living Systems Analysis
    • Meta-Modeling & Systems Epistemology
    • Medical and Health Systems
    • Organizational Transformation & Social Change
    • Research Towards General Theories of Systems
    • Spirituality and Systems
    • Student SIG
    • Systems Applications in Business & Industry
    • Systems Biology and Evolution
    • Systems Modeling & Simulation
    • Systems Pathology
    • Systems Philosophy & Systems Ethics
    • Systems Psychology & Psychiatry
    • Systems Specific Technology
    • What is Life/Living
    • Women and Children

    In addition to paper presentations, the Student SIG and Roundtable will organise sessions, and there will be Mini-Conversations again, based on interactions from the field trip experiences. Anyone who is interested in these sessions is welcome to participate in them without prior notice; no papers or abstracts are required in these sessions.

    Madison 2008 Letter from the President

    ISSS 2008

    Madison, WI Conference

    President’s Letter

    Gary S. Metcalf, Ph.D.

    Regardless of how firm the plans, or how clear the initial vision, a conference is an evolving process. This one even began without a location, since I had no physical university campus or facility from which to host it. Thanks to Tim Allen, our incoming president, we were able to secure space in a beautiful venue on the campus of the University of Wisconsin, in Madison. That was only the beginning of the process, though, because it was through the connection with Tim that I learned much more about his work, and that of his many colleagues and the larger network of researchers focused on the immense complexities of ecological systems and sustainability. Rather than changing the focus of the conference, it only brought more focus and clarity to it.

    The theme initially chosen for the conference was Systems That Make a Difference, drawing from Gregory Bateson’s notion of information as “a difference that makes a difference.” The intent, though, was never to make this a conference about Gregory Bateson, or about his work explicitly. It was to borrow from his thoughts as yet another way to challenge our collective work and our direction as a society. In my incoming presidential address, I tried to capture the same intent in terms of the (apparent) dichotomy between rigor and relevance (explained earlier and more eloquently by Edgar Schein.) It is critical that our work be sound, and that we not tolerate groundless fantasies as representing us. If our work results in no direct value to the larger society, though, we can hardly blame the general public for not understanding.

    We know the implicit value of our work. For over 50 years we have been led and joined by dedicated, intriguing, and often brilliant thinkers. Sometimes others have understood the importance of systems sciences; often they have not. Many of those who have glimpsed its importance have done so at a distance, and opaquely. Universities rarely knew where to situate programs. Funding agencies typically preferred simpler, narrower approaches that promised unequivocal answers or predictions, regardless of their limitations.

    Some have declared the systems sciences to be vestiges of the past; something which had its time, but whose value is gone. On the contrary, it may be another 50 years, or more, before these ideas move into the mainstream.

    In the meantime, sustainability (or some related term) has become a catchword in almost every realm. Unfortunately, it is often used with little rigor or clarity, and thus causes as much confusion as understanding. Individuals and organizations around the world are “going green,” stumbling over themselves to be seen as environmentally conscious, limiting waste, reducing their carbon footprints, and working on renewable strategies. Politicians are promising economic growth through “green jobs,” while battling for which energy subsidies are most likely to benefit their constituents, regardless of the true viability of the source. Companies spend time and money (some with legitimate intent, some not) only to be accused of “greenwashing” when their efforts appear misplaced.

    On the one hand, many of the decisions that are being made today will make a difference, for good or for ill. On another, environmental issues and sustainability seem to be an accessible entry point for thinking about systems, even for those who have little or no familiarity with formal systems concepts. It seems almost impossible, for instance, to study something as an ecosystem (natural, organizational, political, etc.) without considering the interrelatedness of the systems involved.

    Again, the point is not to change the nature or focus of the conference. These are offered only as examples of issues which are in the public consciousness (i.e. have current relevance) and about which systems scientists have done, and are doing, some of the most rigorous work available. Some of our keynote speakers will focus on biological and medical systems. Others come from organizational backgrounds of study. All cross traditional boundaries in terms of their interests and ways of thinking. Our Special Integration Groups (SIGs) offer further diversity of topics and fields of study.

    We have, as society, made a difference simply by carrying forward the ideas of our founders. We have much more that we can do.

    I welcome each of you to this conference, with all of the ideas and energy that you care to bring to it. I think that you will find room for all that you are willing to share and contribute.

    Madison 2008 Featured Speakers

    • Timothy F. H. Allen, President-elect, ISSS (2009) and Professor, Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin
    • Steve Carpenter, Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin
    • Manfred Drack, Researcher, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science, Vienna, Austria
    • Jon Foley, Professor, Department of Sustainability and Global Environment, University of Wisconsin
    • David L. Hawk, Dean of the School of Management and Faculty in the New Jersey School of Architecture, New Jersey Institute of Technology
    • Doug McDavid, Executive Research Consultant, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA
    • Bobby Milstein, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Syndemics Prevention Network
    • Bill Rouse, Professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with a joint appointment in the College of Computing. Also, Fellow, International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) 2006 and recipient of the IBM Faculty Award in 2005 and 2006
    • David Schwartz, Professor, Chemistry and Genetics, University of Wisconsin
    • David Waltner-Toews, Professor, Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph and founding president of the Network for Ecosystem Sustainability and Health
    • Jennifer Wilby, Director of the Centre for Systems Studies and faculty member in Management Systems at the University of Hull, UK

    Madison 2008 Co-Host and Conference Partners

    Madison 2008 Committees

    Committees

    Organizing Committee:

    Jennifer Wilby, ISSS Vice President for Administration

    Gary Metcalf, ISSS President

    Ockie Bosch, ISSS Vice President for Membership and Conferences

    Jed Jones, Sponsorship and Marketing

    Program Committee:

    Chair: Gary Metcalf, ISSS President

    Ockie Bosch, ISSS Vice President for Membership and Conferences

    Jennifer Wilby, ISSS Vice President for Administration

    All SIG chairs and Members of Council

    ISSS Business Office:

    Jennifer Wilby, ISSS Vice President for Administration, isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com

    ISSS Communications:

    ISSS Vice President for Communication and Systems Education, 2008-2009

    Madison 2008 Venue and Travelling to the Conference

    Location: University of Wisconsin, Memorial Union, 800 Langdon Street, Madison, Wisconsin

    The 52nd conference will be held at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, July 13-18, 2008. The University of Wisconsin-Madison is located in Madison, WI, and the campus spreads out along Lake Mendota, encompassing wooded hills, friendly shores and lively city streets. Madison ‹the state's capital city with a population of 208,000) offers the perfect combination of natural beauty, stimulating cultural offerings, outdoor recreation, distinctive restaurants, unique shops and vibrant nightlife.

    The university¹s location in south central Wisconsin makes for convenient access to Milwaukee (80 miles), Chicago (150 miles) and Minneapolis (270 miles). Daily buses serve all three cities.

    Madison has its own airport (MSN). Direct domestic flights may be available from your own US airports. International flights will connect through certain gateway cities such as Chicago, New York, Denver, etc. Contact your own travel agent to find the best travel arrangements from your own airports.

    Taxis and shuttle buses are available from the airport into downtown Madison to the University and conference hotels.

    The Van Galder Tour and Travel company runs a bus service from both Midland and O'Hare Airports in Chicago directly to the University of Wisconsin, Madison Campus, dropping off at the Memorial Union building.

    Related Web Sites

    Madison 2008 Important Dates

    December 5, 2007:  The start of abstract submission and registration. (Please allow at least two weeks for your abstract to be reviewed.)
    December 5, 2007: The start of registration. The on-line registration will be managed using the University of Wisconsin, Madison, registration systems. Off-line paper registrations (by post and fax) will still be available through contact with the ISSS office.
    February 1, 2008: The start of on-line hotel reservation system.
    March 1, 2008: The deadline for panel, workshop and stream proposals.
    April 30, 2008: The end of early, discounted registration.
    May 10, 2008: The deadline for abstracts and full papers, recognizing that some abstracts will not be developed into full papers. Late papers may still be accepted for the conference after May 10, 2008, but will be published on the CD-ROM proceedings for the subsequent year.)
    Special Note: Only ONE paper per registered participant will be accepted for the conference.
    July 13, 2008 Conference Opening

    SIG and Exploratory Groups Full Call for Papers