Brisbane 2009

ISSS2009

53rd Meeting of The International Society for the Systems Sciences

University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

July 12-17, 2009

Brisbane 2009 Banner

Making Liveable, Sustainable Systems Unremarkable

Hosted by The University of Queensland and the School of Integrative Systems, Brisbane, Australia, and
The Australia New Zealand Systems Group (ANZSYS)

Download the Brisbane 2009 conference brochure today!

“Some commentators regard liveability as a more local or short-term manifestation of sustainability while others see it as a necessary but insufficient pre-requisite of sustainability” (Brook Lyndhurst 2004). In practice however, this has not prevented unsustainable actions in the name of liveability. Transport, for example is one such area in which the “pursuit of personal ‘liveability’ can conflict with the liveability of whole neighbourhoods and the community, and more widely with that of sustainable development”.

There are many examples of how liveability, especially in urban and peri-urban areas is affected by the ability of people to have access to and benefit from a physical and cultural environment, key facilities and services, and a secure and supportive community, e.g. environmental markets and emissions trading – Do people want to pay?; the environmental sustainability of increasing longevity through improved health systems; food security and land use; utilising scarce arable land for food or fuel?

Liveability appears to be a constraint on what sustainability will be. However, the questions for sustainability need to address the issue of liveability related to:

  • “for whom” (speaks of people prepared to sacrifice for the longer run;
  • "for how long” (addresses the aftermath of liveability decisions);
  • “at what costs” (is the cost less than for easy liveability);
  • “of what” (identification of what comes when a particular liveability scenario is over).

The question we ask is if liveability can be achieved in cooperation with achieving sustainability or are these concepts in conflict. More important, how can we as systems scientists help to make Liveable, Sustainable Systems Unremarkable – especially in a society where Systems Thinking is often kept out of science and mainstream problem solving?

We encourage those interested in attending the conference to sumbit an abstract for a full paper or poster, or organise a workshop or other event, and begin working with us in creating this important event.

We look forward to seeing you in Queensland!

Professor Timothy F H Allen, President 2008-09

Professor Ockie Bosch, VP Membership and Conferences

 

Confirmed Plenary Guest Speakers

Important Dates

  • December 1, 2008: The start of abstract submission and registration. Instructions for Preparing and Submitting Abstracts and Papers for ISSS Madison 2008 are available.  (Please allow at least two weeks for your abstract to be reviewed.) Please note that the login userid and password to  journals.isss.org is independent of the userid and password on the ISSS World web site.
  • January 1, 2009: On-line registration begins. Off-line paper registrations (by post and fax) will still be available by contacting the ISSS office. Accommodation details will be added shortly; these will be arranged either by booking directly with the University of Queensland accommodation office, or by you contacting individual local hotels (a list will be provided).
  • March 1, 2009: The deadline for panel, workshop and stream proposals.
  • April 30, 2009: The end of early, discounted registration.
  • May 15, 2009: The deadline for full papers. Only ONE paper per registered participant will be accepted for the conference. Late papers may still be accepted for the conference after May 15, 2009, but will be published on the CD-ROM proceedings for the following year (2010).)
  • June 1, 2009. The deadline for abstracts, recognising that abstracts may not be developed into full papers. Only ONE abstract per registered participant will be accepted for the conference. However, if late papers are developed, they may be published on the next year's CDROM proceedings. Late abstracts may be accepted on a space available basis.
  • June 1, 2009. The deadline for poster abstract submission. Posters are exempt from the one abstract/paper submission rule. Poster abstracts are submitted in the same way as paper abstracts, and after abstract acceptance, should be prepared and brought in person to the Conference where space will have been assigned for you to display and discuss your work. Late posters may be accepted on a space available basis.

Venue

The University of Queensland's St Lucia campus is considered by many to be Australia's most attractive. Located seven kilometres from the city's heart on a magnificent 114-hectare site in a bend of the Brisbane River, the campus has expansive landscaped grounds and many playing fields. Its hub is a semi-circle of cloistered buildings enclosing the National Trust-listed Great Court. Download a copy of the campus map in PDF format (500K file size).

The Alumni Teaching Garden in College Road near the river is primarily a teaching and research facility but also includes a quiet area of lush rainforest with public walkways. The adjacent Una Prentice Memorial Garden, bounded by Roberston Walk and Ferry Walk, surrounds two of the three lakes on campus.

Detailed information for accomodation & transport and tourist attractions & tours is available here on the Brisbane 2009 conference pages.

Social Programs

There will be an opening welcome reception on Sunday evening, July 12. The conference banquet will be held on Thursday, July 16. Detailed plans will be announced later.

Registration Rates

  Payment by April 30, 2009 Payment from May 1, 2009
Regular $495 USD $595 USD
Retired $395 USD $495 USD
Developing Country $350 USD $450 USD
Student $275 USD $375 USD

The registration fee includes:

  • The program/abstract book
  • 2009 CD-ROM proceedings
  • Reception on Sunday July 12
  • One banquet ticket for Thursday July 16
  • ISSS membership fees for 2010

The registration fees also includes tea/coffee breaks and lunches from Monday to Thursday.

The registration fee does not cover accommodation or transportation expenses to and from the conference site.

Accommodation ranges from very well appointed dormitary rooms to mid- and upper-range hotels.

Committees

Major content yet to come includes:

  • Brisbane 2009 Program

Quick Links:

Brisbane 2009 Important Dates

 

Conference Important Dates

December 1, 2008 The start of abstract and paper submissions, using the Journals on-line submission site. (Please allow at least two weeks for your abstract to be reviewed.)
January 1, 2009 The start of registration. Registration and payment facilities will be available on-line. Off-line paper registrations (by post and fax) will still be available through contact with the ISSS office.
March 1, 2009 The deadline for panel, workshop and stream proposals.
April 30, 2009 The end of early, discounted registration.
May 1, 2009 The deadline for full papers. Late papers may still be accepted for the conference after May 1, 2009, but will be published on the CD-ROM proceedings for the subsequent year (2010). Only one paper will be accepted from each registered participant.
June 1, 2009 The deadline for abstracts, recognizing that some abstracts will not be developed into full papers. Late anstracts may still be accepted for the conference after June 1, 2009, but only if space is available for presentation. Papers developed from late abstracts may be published on the CD-ROM proceedings for the subsequent year (2010). Only one paper will be accepted from each registered participant.
June 1, 2009 The deadline for poster abstract submission. Posters are exempt from the one abstract/paper submission rule. Poster abstracts are submitted in the same way as paper abstracts, and after abstract acceptance, should be prepared and brought in person to the Conference where space will have been assigned for you to display and discuss your work. Late posters may be accepted on a space available basis.
July 11 and 12, 2009 Pre-Conference Activities: Sustainability Workshops, Systems Tutorials, details to come shortly.
July 13-17, 2009 Conference 2009 (Conference registration, workshops and welcome gathering on July 12, 2009).
July 17-19, 2009 Post-Conference Activities: Sustainability Workshops, Systems Tutorials, details to come shortly.

Conference Schedule

The final program and abstract book including the conference schedule for ISSS2009 can now be downloaded from CONFERENCE PROGRAM BOOK (140 pages, 4.8 MB)

Registration will open on Sunday 12th July, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., in the lobby of the Abel Smith Building on the St Lucia Campus of University of Queensland, Brisbane.

During that afternoon, there will be two workshops available, and these will be followed at 5 p.m. by the conference opening reception in Building 14 (General Purpose North 4) in the Terrace Room.

The first day of the conference will begin at 9 a.m. on July 13th in the Abel Smith Lecture Hall.

Please download the schedule and if you have questions, please contact isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com

 

Brisbane 2009 Featured Speakers

Pre-Conference Workshops

Pre-Conference Workshop One: July 9-11, 2009, Systems Thinking for Complex Problem Solving

Pre-Conference Workshop Two: Sunday July 12, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Professor Len Troncale: The System of Systems Processes Theory (SoSP), A workshop on how systems work (or don't work)

Pre-Conference Workshop Three: Sunday July 12, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Dr John Kineman and Judith Rosen: Fundamentals of Relational Sciences

 

1. Systems Thinking for Complex Problem Solving

July 9-11 2009

Presenters:

Professor Kambiz Maani, Chair in Systems Thinking and Practice - School of Integrative Systems, University of Queensland, AUS

Professor John Bliss, Oregon State University, USA

Dr Carl Smith, School of Integrative Systems, UQ, AUS

Professor Ockie Bosch, Head, School of Integrative Systems, UQ, AUS

Venue:

Collaborative Learning Centre

Room 219 Building 14 – St Lucia Campus, The University of Queensland

Workshop Brief

This workshop introduces Systems Thinking as an integrating paradigm and set of tools for complex problem solving in general, and natural resource management and sustainability in particular.

The workshop integrates Systems Thinking theory and tools in the context of a real-life case. The selected case attempts to address policy, planning and organisational issues related to sustainable tourism in Cambodia using integrated and systemic frameworks. It is expected that key officials from Cambodia will participate as informants for this workshop.

Thus, over 2 days, workshop participants will be exposed to and engage in a real multi dimensional decision-making/problem-solving challenge. The case will be used as a learning platform throughout the workshop.

Note about the ISSS 2009 Conference: This is a pre-conference workshop of the International Society for the Systems Sciences. If you wish to register for the conference, which follows directly after the workshop from 12 to 17 July 2009, please visit the website:www.isss.org/world/brisbane-2009

Program

Day 1, Thursday 9 July

9:00am–5:00pm- Problem Structuring

Professor John Bliss

After a round of introductions we will invest the morning in sharpening our research skills, with special emphasis on case study research. We’ll cover articulating effective research questions, designing an efficient research approach, and selecting appropriate methods. We’ll review case study design and application, data collection and analysis. The remainder of the day will be dedicated to applying case study design concepts to a real-world issue involving natural resource management and sustainable tourism in Cambodia.

Day 2, Friday 10 July

9:00am–12:00pm - Systems Thinking for Managing Complexity – Theory and Practice

Professor Kambiz Maani

This session will introduce Systems Thinking concepts and its qualitative modelling tool known as Causal Loops Diagrams (CLD) as a common ‘language’ for stakeholder communication and problem solving. The Iceberg Model will be discussed as a framework for integration and complex multi-stakeholder problem solving. The UNESCO biosphere project in VietNam (Cat Ba Island) will be discussed as a demonstration case of the application of Systems Thinking in multi-dimensional multi-stakeholder problems - in this case the role of integrated policy and planning in social, environmental, and economic domains.

1:00pm–5:00pm - Bayesian Belief Networks – a tool for group decision support and adaptive management

Dr. Carl Smith & Professor Ockie Bosch

This session will focus on the application of Bayesian Networks as a knowledge integration tool for natural resource management. The first part will include an introduction to Bayesian Network models and examples of how they have been applied to natural resource management problems. The second part will involve a practical session in which you will build your own Bayesian Network model for a chosen case study topic.

Day 3, Saturday 11 July

9:00am-12:00pm - Integrating Tools for Strategic Thinking

John Bliss and Carl Smith, facilitated by Kambiz Maani

This session will combine the concepts and tools learned in the first two days and will provide guidelines on how to integrate these and other relevant tools for problem solving  and strategic thinking in complex domains.

Registration Form

Please note that numbers are restricted to ensure a high quality experience for participants. Early registration is essential to book a place. Please contact: mlmoore@uq.edu.au or fax: +61 7 3365 9016 or click here to download the booking form.

NOTES TO STUDENTS:

If you are a student already registered with the ISSS conference, you will not pay any additional fees for the pre-conference workshop. Please write your ISSS registration number in the payment fees due line of the pre-conference workshop registration form.

If you are a student who has not yet registered for the ISSS Conference, then by registering for the pre-conference you will be able to attend the ISSS conference for the additional cost of US$50 to cover refreshments, lunches and conference materials. You may also wish to register for the opening reception (US$25) and (US$50) for the banquet. Please indicate which of these you require on the pre-conference booking form.

Accommodation

Workshop attendees are requested to book directly with accommodation providers in Brisbane. See ISSS 2009 Conference website for more information (www.isss.org/world/brisbane-2009).

Less costly accommodation is available on the St Lucia Campus of The University of Queensland.

Download a copy of the campus map in PDF format (500K file size).

St Leo's College website | booking form)
$60/night for standard room with shared bathroom facilities, includes meals
(Booking form attached to add to ISSS website, approximately 60 rooms set aside)

The Women's College website | booking form)
$76/night for single room with ensuite facilities, includes hot breakfast
$65/night for single room with shared facilities, includes hot breakfast
(Booking form attached to add to ISSS website, approximately 80 rooms set aside, 20 ensuite rooms and 60-80 single rooms with shared facilities)

All registrants for pre-conference, please book your accommodation directly by using the booking form links above (ie arr: 8/9 July and dep: 17 July 2009).

 

2. Workshop Two

John Kineman and Judith Rosen
An Update on 2008 workshop on Fundamentals of Relational Sciences
THE WORK OF ROBERT ROSEN

 

3. Workshop Two

 

Len Troncale & Student Fellows

Dept. of Biology and

Institute for Advanced Systems Studies

California State Polytechnic University

Pomona, California, 91768

lrtroncale@csupomona.edu

 

How can one apply the new “system of systems” (SoS) knowledge to design or “heal” “human” or hybrid “human-natural” systems & improve their sustainability without a detailed knowledge of how systems work? Just as modern medicine requires a very detailed knowledge of how your normal body system works, an astonishing array of diagnostic measures, a deep understanding of interactions, a panoply of treatments, and a philosophy of “not doing harm when intervening,” so also will systems science need a detailed SoSP-based systems pathology to solve systems problems. Where will you as a student of systems get such a detailed knowledge?

Even the most recent generation of systems science approaches still does not have the unified theory necessary to approach solution of SoS crises. Yet large-scale crisis problems such as breakdown of international financial stability, pandemics, global warming, weather disasters, world hunger, species extinction, energy systems will not wait. The need is great; the need is now. “In each of these cases, fundamental understanding concerning the evolution of interacting subsystems into a mature system was missing. This lack of understanding prevented the prediction of now-obvious outcomes with information that was, in hindsight, clearly available.” (1)

The SoSP model provides systems researchers with an alternative approach. This model is a candidate general theory of systems that emphasizes detailed knowledge of a hundred systems processes (or mechanisms) by which systems work (or don’t work when the processes go awry). Unlike other candidate general theories, the SoSP model focuses on many systems mechanisms. In fact, the SoSP proposes numerous “Linkage Propositions” that describe & formalize how the many systems processes interact to produce key systems structures & behaviors.

This four-hour, pre-conference workshop presents and discusses 20 aspects of the SoSP. During this time, you will gain a comprehensive overview of the underlying theory that may best inform you in solving systems problems. We need to have students who have the knowledge & tools to more effectively deal with these challenges now & in the future. If you have not been trained in a wide range of systems mechanisms, or more importantly how those processes interact in a network of complexity, this may be where you can begin to get that vital training. Join us also if you want to get in on the ground floor of the Institute for Systems-Integrated Sciences (ISIS) or the Federation of Pacific Rim Complex Systems Institutes (PARCSI). 

Some of the topics we will cover include:

  • Defining what we face & what we need: sustainability & crisis SOS human problems, 

  • Tenets & initial findings of the SoSP 

  • What is a Systems Process (SP)? Lists & Descriptions of 100+ isomorphic SP’s

  • Case Studies across 7 natural sciences & social science of selected Systems Processes

  • Twenty things that should be known about each Systems Process & how to get that info to student users

  • Defining hundreds of Linkage Propositions; the crucial difference in the SoSP

  • How the SoSP naturally generates useful new disciplines like Systems Pathology, Artificial Systems Research, Systems Allometry, & Comparative Systems Analysis (CSA)

  • Computerized tools for building, sharing, and using SoSP, and much more …

Registration and Arrangements: Instead of hardcopy handouts, we will issue two-month subscriptions to our CSA Wiki site for the Workshop Registration fee of US$100. As soon as registration is received, a user name and password will allow participants access to the 200 slide power points, foundation research articles, & the electronic versions of the 30 SoSP introductory posters shown at the ISSS conference. Two alternative registrations would be: (a) US$35 if no handouts or Wiki password, just witnessing attendance, or (b) “your proposal” of "long term participation" in the project via the internet for US$25. Please contact isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com for payment instructions as soon as possible.

[1] System of Systems Colloquium: Exploring the State-of-the-Art of System of Systems: Theory, Applications, and Vital Issues (Sponsored by and a Report to the National Science Foundation 

Washington, D.C.)

 

 

Brisbane 2009 Registration

Online Payment

There are several levels of registration available to you, depending on whether you choose full conference participation or, if  local, only one- or two-day registrations.

One and two-day registrations do NOT include the cost of reception or banquet fees so these must be added as additional ticket choices as you register. 

Three days attendance or more should register using full week fees categories.

On-line registration for all categories and payment options for Brisbane 2009 delegates is available by following this link: OnLine Registration

PLEASE NOTE: This online registration system is for bonafide Conference Participants ONLY, i.e. those people coming to the conference and participating in the conference. If you are trying to register for the sole purpose of obtaining a Visa or Invite Letter to circumvent Australian immigration regulations, with no intention of participating, do NOT proceed further. Thank you.

Offline Payment

An alternative to online registration is available by downloading the registration form and:

  • mailing this form to the address stated on the form
  • emailing the form as an attachment to isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com, or
  • faxing this form to +44 1759 302718 to the ISSS office.

The Brisbane 2009 Conference Registration Form can be downloaded as an Acrobat document, or as a Microsoft Word document.

These downloadable templates can either be filled in with a word processor, or by hand. A signature for credit card charges is required.

If you need an invoice for payment by your institution, please contact the ISSS office at isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com

If you require a letter of invitation for your institution or for visa requirements, please also contact the ISSS office at isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com

Registration Rates

  Payment by April 30, 2009 Payment from May 1, 2009
Regular $495 USD $595 USD
Retired $395 USD $495 USD
Developing Country $350 USD $450 USD
Student $275 USD $375 USD


A maximum of one abstract/paper will be accepted for the conference.

Additional opening reception ($25) and banquet tickets($50) for guests may also be purchased. Please use the registration form to order these tickets.

Cancellation and Refund Policy

The ISSS makes every effort to keep the costs of the annual meeting as low as possible. Once a conference has been arranged there are fixed costs that the ISSS must pay, irrespective of the number of people attending the conference. For this reason, the ISSS cannot issue refunds outside the terms of its refund policy.

Refund Schedule
Prior to May 1 Refund minus $50 admin fee
May 1 to June 15 Refund of 50% of registration cost
June 15 to conference No refund
No shows at conference No refund


You should arrange appropriate travel or other insurance to cover any possibilities of loss through cancellation.

All requests for refunds must be submitted to isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com.

Changes to the category of registration will incur a $50 administration fee in addition to the new rate cost, to cover bank charges for refunds and administration.

If you are unable to attend, the registration can be transferred to another individual to take your place and that person may present your work.

If you do not attend the conference and have not transferred your place to another person, all conference materials and 2010 membership will be sent to you after the conference.

 

 

Brisbane 2009 Conference Announcement and Call for Participation

Making Liveable, Sustainable Systems Unremarkable

Hosted by The University of Queensland and the School of Integrative Systems, Brisbane, Australia, and The Australia New Zealand Systems Group (ANZSYS)

"Some commentators regard liveability as a more local or short-term manifestation of sustainability while others see it as a necessary but insufficient pre-requisite of sustainability" (Brook Lyndhurst 2004). In practice however, this has not prevented unsustainable actions in the name of liveability. Transport, for example is one such area in which the "pursuit of personal 'liveability' can conflict with the liveability of whole neighbourhoods and the community, and more widely with that of sustainable development".

There are many examples of how liveability, especially in urban and peri-urban areas is affected by the ability of people to have access to and benefit from a physical and cultural environment, key facilities and services, and a secure and supportive community, e.g. environmental markets and emissions trading; Do people want to pay?; the environmental sustainability of increasing longevity through improved health systems; food security and land use; utilising scarce arable land for food or fuel?

Liveability appears to be a constraint on what sustainability will be. However, is the questions for sustainability to address the issue of liveability related to:

  • "for whom" (speaks of people prepared to sacrifice for the longer run;
  • "for how long" (addresses the aftermath of liveability decisions);
  • "at what costs" (is the cost less than for easy liveability);
  • "of what" (identification of what comes when a particular liveability scenario is over).

The question we ask is if liveability can be achieved in cooperation with achieving sustainability or are these concepts in conflict. More important, how can we as systems scientists help to make Liveable, Sustainable Systems Unremarkable - especially in a society where Systems Thinking is often kept out of science and mainstream problem solving?

We encourage those interested in attending the conference to submit an abstract for a full paper or poster, or organise a workshop or other event, and begin working with us in creating this important meeting.

Please review the following SIG and Exploratory streams Calls for Papers and contact the named chair to begin developing your contribution to the meeting.

We look forward to seeing you in Queensland!
Professor Timothy F H Allen, President 2008-09
Professor Ockie Bosch, VP Membership and Conferences

Call for Papers

Although the conference will accept papers related to the following areas of research, the list is neither exclusive nor restrictive. Proposals of new sessions and tracks are very welcome, but should be submitted for consideration by March 1, 2009. Each session chair takes the final responsibility for running his/her session. All submitted papers are encouraged to state how relevant the paper is with regard to systems thinking, systems modeling and/or systems practice. The areas listed below have additional contact and content information listed for each specific SIG Calls for Papers page.

Areas proposed by existing Special Integration Groups (SIGs) [click here for full contact details] and current exploratory groups:

SIGs

  • Agent-based Social Systems Sciences
  • Aging Systems
  • Balancing Individualism and Collectivism
  • Critical Systems Theory and Practice
  • Designing Educational Systems
  • Evolutionary Development
  • Hierarchy Theory
  • Human Systems Inquiry
  • Information Systems Design & Information Technology
  • ISSS Roundtable
  • Living Systems Analysis
  • Medical and Health Systems
  • Meta-Modeling & Systems Epistemology
  • Organizational Transformation & Social Change
  • Research Towards General Theories of Systems
  • Socio-Ecological Systems
  • Spirituality and Systems
  • Student SIG
  • Systemic Approaches to Conflict and Crises
  • Systems Applications in Business & Industry
  • Systems Biology and Evolution
  • Systems and Mental Health
  • Systems Modeling & Simulation
  • Systems Pathology
  • Systems Philosophy & Systems Ethics
  • Systems Specific Technology
  • What is Life/Living

Exploratory Groups

  • Arts Based Inquiry
  • Foundations of Information Systems
  • Monetary Systems

In addition to paper presentations, the Student SIG and Roundtable will organise sessions, and there will be Mini-Conversations, based on interactions from the field trip experiences. Anyone who is interested in these sessions is welcome to participate in them without prior notice; no papers or abstracts are required in these sessions.

SIG Contact Details

Please contact the following SIG chairs for further information and any questions you may have about submitting a paper to a specific SIG.

SIGs SIG Chair(s) Contact
Agent-based Social Simulation Shingo Takahashi shingo@waseda.jp
Aging Systems Daniel Hershey Daniel.Hershey@uc.edu
Applied Systems & Development Dennis Finlayson and Jae Yu dfinlayson@btopenworld.com
Critical Systems Theory & Practice Jennifer Wilby  j.wilby@hull.ac.uk
Designing Educational Systems Ockie Bosch o.bosch@uq.edu.au
Duality Theory ISSS Office 2008cnf@dsl.pipex.com
Evolutionary Development Alexander and Kathia Laszlo info@syntonyquest.org
Futurism & Systems Change open isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com
Hierarchy Theory Jennifer Wilby j.wilby@hull.ac.uk
Human Systems Inquiry ISSS Office 2008cnf@dsl.pipex.com
Living Systems Analysis Jim Simms jrsimms@juno.com
Medical and Health Systems Thomas Wong Edu@EC-Balance.com
Meta-Modeling & Systems Epistemology Janet McIntyre janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au
Organisational Transformation & Social Change Maurice Yolles prof.m.yolles@gmail.com
Primer Project Tom Mandel thommandel@aol.com
Research Towards General Theories of Systems Lynn Rasmussen lynn@lynnras.com
Roundtable Sue Gabriele sgabriele@gemslearning.com
Spirituality and Systems Carl Swanson CarlT.Swanson@gmail.com
Students SIG Nicholas Magliocca nrm@duke.edu
Systems Applications in Business & Industry David Ing isss@daviding.com
Systems Biology and Evolution Len Troncale lrtroncale@csupomona.edu
Systems Design & Information Technology Bela A Banathy babanathy@yahoo.com
Systems Modeling & Simulation ISSS Office 2008cnf@dsl.pipex.com
Systems Pathology Len Troncale lrtroncale@csupomona.edu
Systems Philosophy & Systems Ethics ISSS Office 2008cnf@dsl.pipex.com
Systems Psychology & Psychiatry (Mental Health) Tamar Zohar Harel and
Pamela Buckle Henning
tzoharel@macam.ac.il
buckle@adelphi.edu Information
Systems Specific Technology Vadim Kvitash Kvitash@hotmail.com
What is Life/Living John Kineman john.kineman@colorado.edu
Women and Children Anne Nelson nelsongroup@comcast.net

EXPLORATORY GROUPS

Arts Based Inquiry Lezlie Kinyon isss06lezlie@yahoo.com
Foundations of Information Systems Soren Brier and Bela Banathy sbr.lpf@cbs.dk 
babanathy@yahoo.com

In addition the above sessions, the Student SIG and ISSS Roundtable SIG will be organized and the format for these sessions is interwoven into the program. These groups do not accept abstracts or paper submissions. Anyone who is interested is welcome and invited to participate; please see the website for information about the organization of these sessions or contact Nicholas Magliocca (Student SIG) or Sue Gabriele (Roundtable SIG) for further information.

Brisbane 2009 Co-Host and Conference Partners

Conference Hosts

 

  • The University of Queensland and the School of Integrative Systems, Brisbane, Australia
  • The Australia New Zealand Systems Group (ANZSYS)

Conference Partners

Brisbane 2009 Committees

Committees

 

Organizing Committee

Jennifer Wilby, ISSS Vice President for Administration

Tim Allen, ISSS President

Ockie Bosch, ISSS Vice President for Membership and Conferences

Jed Jones, ISSS Vice President for Communications and Systems Education

 

Program Committee

Chair: Tim Allen, ISSS President

Ockie Bosch, ISSS Vice President for Membership and Conferences

Jennifer Wilby, ISSS Vice President for Administration

Alexander and Kathia Laszlo

SIG chairs and Members of Council

 

Local Organizing Committee

Chair: Ockie Bosch, ISSS VP for Membership and Conferences

Helen Ross, UQ

John Herbohn, UQ

Kambiz Maani, UQ

Carl Smith, UQ

Rachel Reck, UQ

Bob Cavana, ANZSYS

Bill Hutchinson, ANZSYS

Janet McIntyre, Flinders University, Adelaide

John Broadbent 

ISSS Business Office

Jennifer Wilby, ISSS Vice President for Administration, isssoffice@dsl.pipex.com

 

ISSS Communications:

Jed C. Jones, ISSS Vice President for Communications and Systems Education, 2008-2009

Brisbane 2009 Accommodation & Transport

Directions to St Lucia campus please click here: www.uq.edu.au/maps/directions.html

Accommodation

Location numbers on the map refer to the numbered hotels listed below. There is a ferry stop very close to hotel 3, although there are stops all along the river, dropping off at the UQ campus near the 'Y' of university on the map below.

The large dot on the UQ campus is the approximate location of the Conference Meeting Rooms.

The South Bank area has lots of restaurants and entertainment, and lovely sandy beaches!

Brisbane 2009 Accommodations Map

St. Lucia Campus

Download a copy of the campus map in PDF format (500K file size).

St Leo's College 
This choice of accommodation is no longer available.

The Women's College (website | booking form)
$76/night for single room with ensuite facilities, includes hot breakfast
$65/night for single room with shared facilities, includes hot breakfast
(Booking form attached to add to ISSS website, approximately 80 rooms set aside, 20 ensuite rooms and 60-80 single rooms with shared facilities)

Brisbane City

1. 5 STAR HOTEL
Stamford Plaza Brisbane
 
2. 4.5 STAR HOTEL
Oaks Felix Brisbane
 
3. 4 STAR HOTEL
Medina Executive Brisbane
$144/night for standard 1 bedroom
$160/night for Riverview Room 1 bedroom
(Group booking for 30 rooms currently secured, 15 of each room)
Email: mebn@medina.com.au
Quote: #4539795
Contact: Emma White @ Reservations
 
4. 3.5 STAR HOTEL
Hotel Ibis Brisbane
 
5. 3 STAR HOTEL
Hotel George Williams, Brisbane
$120/night for standard hotel room (1 double bed)
$140/night for queen room (1 queen bed)
$150/night for queen deluxe (1 queen bed)
(Noted on their system)
Email: reservations@hgw.com.au
Quote: ISSS Conference 2009

In addition to these options, you can check additional up to the minute Brisbane Accommodation options and costs, bookable online at the following websites:

www.BrisbaneAccommodation.tv 

Hotels Combined provides a price comparison system, and there is 10% rebate on accommodation cost available to participants of ISSS who book through one of their participating websites. You can find more information from their conference support scheme pages. To take advantage of this, you will need to book through their  list of hotels in Brisbane. An advanced more detailed list is available at Advance Listing.

Transport

Brisbane Airport to Brisbane City
The AIRTRAIN is the cheapest way to get from the airport to the city (Roma Street Station). From there to St Lucia campus taxis (easiest) and buses could be used.
 
Brisbane City to St Lucia Campus 
Ferries travel at frequent intervals from various spots along the Brisbane River to the St Lucia Campus. Bus services are also available for those who want to stay in a city hotel.
City Cat & Ferry Service

 

Brisbane 2009 Letter from the President

We are all familiar with the names of luminaries in the systems sciences.  We each have our favorites whose achievements express most comfortably our individual perspectives on what is systems thinking and how it applies.  While I stand in deep respect of all of the great names, some of whom I have been lucky enough to know as acquaintances and even some to have as personal friends, if I must choose one it is Robert Rosen.  I hope to do more than translate him for a wider audience in my life, but that in itself would be achievement enough.  Several of us hope the upcoming meeting does some of that.  But for all the towering figures of our discourse, there are remarkably few institutions in systems science that have proven to be stable and robust enough to stand the test of the passing of the individuals who founded them.

Deans step in and dismantle what they do not understand, taking the money for their discipline centered favorites.  Perhaps the University of Florida, Gainesville will have the wisdom to continue the thrust of H. T. Odum, but these are early days after our having lost his personal presence. 

But then to give the lie to all I have said above stands the University of Queensland, Brisbane, the setting of our upcoming meeting.  Is it something in water Northern Australia, or the great demand from busineses and a “dry-continent-society” to help them dealing with the complexities of sustainability and climate change adaptation that a center for systems sciences is there?  Better than that, I do not see any one person as the singular figure head of it all, no Churchman or Odum or Boulding give systems in Queensland its identity.  Rather there is a full set of energetic systems scientists running a broad curriculum of excellence in the field.  There may be some distinctive systems scientists e.g. (Bosch and Maani) who set things going in Brisbane, and perhaps we will learn of a remarkable history when we are there in July.  But even if that proves to be the case what I see now is rather a set of schools and a university at large pressing forward on general systems thinking on a broad front.  Deans and administrative leaders will welcome us and are supporting the effort of our members as they plan a great meeting.

Brisbane systems science is here to stay.  And for me personally I am most excited that it is environmentally centered, all the way from basic environmental science to deeply applied systems thinking with people and values forcing complexity upon us. 

And the theme of our meeting is cutting edge.  It focuses on sustainability and livability, an essential double stage way into the future.  That theme addresses an issue that has been central to my own development as a system scientist: scale.  Scale is the issue at the center of hierarchy theory, my own passion.  We cannot get to a planned rational future without both long and short term perspectives.  In the end it is a grand vision of a happy long term for our planet and ourselves.  But we cannot get there without going through a series of local times with people in them.  The unfolding long plan must always be acceptable, or better still embraced, by the people who must live at that time while planning for their respective futures.  In the realm of livability human values keep changing, but must be continually met, their transience notwithstanding.  The path to sustainability must pass through all of the differently valued livabilities until over the long term sustainability is the outcome.  As the values for what is livable change, sometimes they must include accepting what might have been seen as unacceptable and a failure in the past, but is in the respective present the best realistic outcome.  It took gasoline prices to double in months for livability in the United States to include rejecting SUVs and trucks.  The change in values was reflected in sales of those vehicles as they plummeted.  The price of a second hand Cadillac is so low now that it might make sense to buy one and pay the higher fuel prices.  So the dual issues of sustainability and livability together are very much a complex systems issue that invokes more than one level of analysis.  There is plenty for systems theorists and practitioner to bite on. 

But there is another prong to the trident with which this meeting will probe the future.  While looking at two places separated by centuries, Joseph Tainter discussed the Rio Grande Valley in New Mexico and Epirus in Greece.  He saw a parallel in stunning detail in the change in both places from self-sufficient subsistent peasantry to unemployment in a tourist economy.  The common cause for the unfortunate twin outcomes was the intrusion of new information from outside.  At the end of his paper, Tainter suggested that all parts of contemporary humanity from the First to the Third World face similar predicaments.  His solution is global systems thinking, which he says can only be achieved by education from a very early age.  Only in that way can humans come to see global systems thinking as unremarkable.  It is Tainter's choice of the word "unremarkable" stimulated me to include it in the theme for the meeting over which I will preside.  Yes livable sustainability is a fine goal for the systems community, but we will not get far until it becomes something unremarkable, something the rank and file take for granted.
It is the old problem of how do we get systems thinking into the mainstream, an issue that has challenged all of us who have been systems thinkers for any length of time.  This, of course, touches on global matters, and in particular on education.  The University of Queensland appears to find systems thinking unremarkable, in that many of its even discipline centered programs teach it and integrate it as a matter of course.  What a unique place Brisbane will be for us all to move forward in a way that really matters.  Please come join us in Brisbane for what promises to be a fully remarkable event. 

Timothy Allen,
President of the ISSS.

Timothy F. H. Allen
Botany Dept, 430 Lincoln Drive
University of Wisconsin
Madison WI 53706-1381
608 262 2692 phone
608 262 7509 fax

Brisbane 2009 Tourist Attractions & Tours

Brisbane
Dreamworld
Seaworld
Movie World
Outback Spectacular
Australia Zoo
Story Bridge Adventure Climb

For those who wish to travel to other areas of Queensland and Australia pre-and post conference, various tour packages are now available. Please download the attached flyer for tours you can arrange before or after the conference.

The official tourist/holiday website for the state of Queensland can be found at www.queenslandholidays.com.au

Adventure Tours Australia is an award winning tourism company and is offering special rates for ISSS members!  As indicated in the Adventure Tours offers many tours out of all main centres in Australia, including Alice Springs (Ayers Rock, Kings Canyon, etc.), Darwin (Kakadu) and Cairns (Great Barrier Reef) for those who wish to be a bit more adventurous. This company also has self driven vehicles that are custom designed for couples called "Spaceships". These can be picked up and dropped at various depots in Sydney, Brisbane, Cairns, Adelaide and Melbourne. "Spaceships" are a good car to drive with more useful features than a camper van. For more information see www.spaceships.tv (and select "For hire in Australia").

Adventure Tours are also offering a group arrangement to travel by bus from Sydney to Brisbane leaving July 10 and arriving in Brisbane on the evening of July 12. 

If you are interested in these tours, you must contact the company directly by emailing fiona@adventuretours.com.au to make a booking.

The 3 day itinerary is based on the details below.
 
This cost is inclusive of:
·          3 days hire of Australian Guide/Vehicle & Fuel
 
·          Meals as indicated
·          National Park Fees
·          Dolphin and Whale Watching Cruise
·          3* Twin share Motel accommodation
 
Not included:
Pre & post accommodation and flights.
Any optional activities, entrance fees, extras, and items of a personal nature.
 
Extra Details:
Single upgrade available subject to availability, cost to be advised.
 
10th July Sydney to Coff’s Harbour
Meals incl: Lunch
Accommodation: 3* Motel twin share
The group will depart form the Adventure Tours Shop at 804 George Street, Sydney at 7am
This morning the group will head to Port Stephens. Port Stephens is a beautiful Port only two and a half hours drive north of Sydney.  Port Stephens is home to around 165 bottlenose dolphins, which live in the Port itself.   Here the group will be able to participate in a boat cruise to see whales on their seasonal migration and the dolphins, the tour includes free tea, coffee and biscuits.  After the boat tour the group will depart for their overnight accommodation in Coff’s Harbour, home of the “Big Banana”.
 
11th July Coff’s Harbour to Byron Bay
Meals incl: Continental Breakfast and Lunch
Accommodation: 3* Motel twin share   
After breakfast the group will head North along the spectacular NSW coast to Byron Bay.  Passengers spend the afternoon at their leisure in Byron Bay, a chic and relaxed seaside town with glorious beaches and an eclectic mix of shops, cafes and art galleries.  Why not enjoy take-away fish and chips on the beach at sunset (at own expense).
 
12 July Byron Bay to Brisbane
Meals incl: Continental Breakfast and Lunch
Today the group will head to the world heritage listed Springbrook National Park to enjoy a guided walk to the spectacular Natural Bridge waterfall.  This region allows visitors to experience one of the few areas of remnant Gondwana rainforests in Australia, along with Springbrook’s unique Geology and fauna.  Lastly passengers can enjoy the scenery of the Gold Coast as they head into Brisbane. Group to be dropped off at selected accommodation (at own expense).