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No Sessions this week
Saturday, March 5th, 2022, 7am to 9am
We do not have a session planned for this week.
Past Presidents' Reflections: Professor Michael Jackson
Saturday, March 12th, 2022, 7am to 9am at On line
Past Presidents' Reflections: Professor Michael Jackson
In this series we invite Past Presidents of the Society to share their reflections on the history, the current state, and the future of the Society. This will be a free-form conversation and an opportunity for newer members to meet and get to know more about some of our past leaders that have gotten the Society to where it is today. Come and hear the accumulated wisdom from the last several decades.
Past Presidents' Reflections: Professor Michael Jackson
Wednesday, March 16th, 2022, 12pm to 2pm at online
Past Presidents' Reflections: Professor Michael Jackson
In this series we invite Past Presidents of the Society to share their reflections on the history, the current state, and the future of the Society. This will be a free-form conversation and an opportunity for newer members to meet and get to know more about some of our past leaders that have gotten the Society to where it is today. Come and hear the accumulated wisdom from the last several decades.
ISSS Book Club
Thursday, March 17th, 2022, 12:30pm to 2pm at Online
The purpose of the book club is to explore the systems science literature in depth, so books are read over several months, with monthly reading assignments of approximately 50-100 pages. Check the book club's webpage for the current reading assignments.
Robin Hahnel: Participatory Economics
Saturday, March 19th, 2022, 7am to 9am at on line
Abstract:
In the aftermath of the collapse of 20th century “really existing socialism” there has been a great deal of debate over what 21st century socialism should mean instead. Those who reject some version of market socialism argue instead for some version of democratic and participatory economic planning. One objection raised to these proposals for conducting democratic economic planning is that they would simply take up too much of people’s time, and therefore using markets to coordinate our interrelated economic activities is a practical necessity if we are to avoid authoritarian, top-down planning. In our proposal for a “participatory economy” worker and consumer councils submit and revise proposals until a feasible plan is reached. Critics suggested this would take so many rounds of submissions, revisions, and resubmissions as to render our proposal impractical. We have now simulated our planning procedure to see how many “rounds” might be required, to shed light on whether or not our proposal appears to be impractical. After briefly explaining how the “participatory” planning procedure works, we present results of our computer simulations, and what they suggest about the practicality of participatory planning as an alternative to both markets and authoritarian planning.
 
Bio:
Robin Hahnel is Professor Emeritus from American University in Washington DC where he taught in the department of economics for thirty-three years. He has also taught as a visiting professor at the Catholic University in Lima Peru, the University of Manchester in Manchester England, and most recently at Lewis and Clark College, Portland State University, and Willamette University in Oregon where he now lives. He is best known as co-creator together with Michael Albert of the alternative to capitalism known as a “participatory economy.” His most recent books are Economic Justice and Democracy: From Competition to Cooperation (Routledge 2005), Green Economics: Confronting the Ecological Crisis (M.E. Sharpe 2011), Of the People, By the People: The Case for a Participatory Economy (AK Press 2012), The ABCs of Political Economy: A Modern Approach, (Pluto Books 2014), and Democratic Economic Planning (Routledge 2021).
Robin Hahnel: Participatory Economics
Wednesday, March 23rd, 2022, 12pm to 2pm
Abstract:
In the aftermath of the collapse of 20th century “really existing socialism” there has been a great deal of debate over what 21st century socialism should mean instead. Those who reject some version of market socialism argue instead for some version of democratic and participatory economic planning. One objection raised to these proposals for conducting democratic economic planning is that they would simply take up too much of people’s time, and therefore using markets to coordinate our interrelated economic activities is a practical necessity if we are to avoid authoritarian, top-down planning. In our proposal for a “participatory economy” worker and consumer councils submit and revise proposals until a feasible plan is reached. Critics suggested this would take so many rounds of submissions, revisions, and resubmissions as to render our proposal impractical. We have now simulated our planning procedure to see how many “rounds” might be required, to shed light on whether or not our proposal appears to be impractical. After briefly explaining how the “participatory” planning procedure works, we present results of our computer simulations, and what they suggest about the practicality of participatory planning as an alternative to both markets and authoritarian planning.
 
Bio:
Robin Hahnel is Professor Emeritus from American University in Washington DC where he taught in the department of economics for thirty-three years. He has also taught as a visiting professor at the Catholic University in Lima Peru, the University of Manchester in Manchester England, and most recently at Lewis and Clark College, Portland State University, and Willamette University in Oregon where he now lives. He is best known as co-creator together with Michael Albert of the alternative to capitalism known as a “participatory economy.” His most recent books are Economic Justice and Democracy: From Competition to Cooperation (Routledge 2005), Green Economics: Confronting the Ecological Crisis (M.E. Sharpe 2011), Of the People, By the People: The Case for a Participatory Economy (AK Press 2012), The ABCs of Political Economy: A Modern Approach, (Pluto Books 2014), and Democratic Economic Planning (Routledge 2021).
Past Presidents' Reflections: Dr. Gary Metcalf
Saturday, March 26th, 2022, 7am to 9am at On line
Past Presidents' Reflections: Dr. Gary Metcalf
Gary S. Metcalf, PhD was ISSS President for the 2008 conference year.  He served as President / Vice President for the International Federation for Systems Research from 2002 to 2018, and is a Fellow of the IFSR.  His background includes work as a family therapist; as a manager in large corporations; and 20 years of teaching MBA and PhD students in systems theories, management, leadership, and research methods, in the US, Finland, and India.  He has taught, consulted, and conducted research with the US Government, IKEA, and with Service Systems projects in Tokyo.  He has published and edited volumes in three different series for Springer.  
 
Gary’s most recent work has focused on human issues related to climate change.  This presentation will address the challenges of understanding current global changes, and the potential for designing better futures.
 
 
Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion in the Systems Sciences SIG Meeting
Monday, March 28th, 2022, 11am to 12:30pm at Online
The DEI SIG is currently meeting monthly on the fourth Monday of the month.
Past Presidents' Reflections: Dr. Gary Metcalf
Wednesday, March 30th, 2022, 12pm to 2pm at online
Past Presidents' Reflections: Gary Metcalf
 
Gary S. Metcalf, PhD was ISSS President for the 2008 conference year.  He served as President / Vice President for the International Federation for Systems Research from 2002 to 2018, and is a Fellow of the IFSR.  His background includes work as a family therapist; as a manager in large corporations; and 20 years of teaching MBA and PhD students in systems theories, management, leadership, and research methods, in the US, Finland, and India.  He has taught, consulted, and conducted research with the US Government, IKEA, and with Service Systems projects in Tokyo.  He has published and edited volumes in three different series for Springer.  
 
Gary’s most recent work has focused on human issues related to climate change.  This presentation will address the challenges of understanding current global changes, and the potential for designing better futures.